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Framing tips


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#1 Deji Joseph

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 10:20 AM

Yesterday I went for Phillip blooms dslr meet up in london and I took my 7d with me. I recently purchased a gas removable LCD cover and have put a 2.35 aspect ratioed mask on it. I decided to test it by documenting the meet up. Immediately the framing seemed foreign to me. Maybe because I have only shoot 1.78 for the last three years. When I got home I got some frame graves off the Internet and noticed the framing is very different e.g a headshot Normally has eyes a third down with the top of the head cut off and space between the chin and the screen edge. I was wondering if there are any other guidelines for coverage in 2.35?

Also from my experience high shots make the character seem fragile and low shots imply domination with Dutch angles highlighting discourse. Any other was I can show relationship between two characters by framing?

Edited by Deejay Joseph, 31 May 2011 - 10:22 AM.

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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 10:45 AM

Headroom guidelines are generally the same for 2.40 movies. Rule of Thirds also can be applied. It's just that being such a wide aspect ratio, it lends itself naturally to more modernist compositions that use large areas of negative space. But one can also compose 2.40 very classically, balanced.

For example, the wide shot here in "Superman" balances the two figures on the left with the farm house on the right:
Posted Image

But the singles are pushed farther to the edges than the Rule of Thirds, and doesn't use over-the-shoulders, as a way of creating visual isolation that foreshadows the actual separation of the two characters, enhancing a feeling of loneliness:
Posted Image
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#3 Deji Joseph

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 11:24 AM

Thanks for replying David. From what I've noticed there aren't many background objects in the dead space unless they are metaphors, should I follow this?
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 31 May 2011 - 11:47 AM

I don't know if you always have that level of control over what's in the background.
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#5 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 01 June 2011 - 07:06 AM

I don't know if you always have that level of control over what's in the background.

I guess that would be one of the biggest limitations of location work, not having the time and control to alter the frame, specifically the backgrounds. Whereas you can always begin a shift of creative perspective with just the camera and lens itself.

Edited by Marcus Joseph, 01 June 2011 - 07:07 AM.

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