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When was Sony BVW-600 Betacm sp introduced?


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#1 Alex Lindblom

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 02:29 PM

Anybody knows When Sony BVW-600 Betacm sp was introduced? I have searched but I just can't seem to find it.

Thanks.

Alex


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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 03:02 PM

Anybody knows When Sony BVW-600 Betacm sp was introduced? I have searched but I just can't seem to find it.

Thanks.

Alex


Can't find an exact date anywhere... This article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betacam

Suggests it must have been after 1986 (when Beta-SP was introduced) but before 1993 (when Digital Betacam was introduced.) Since the BVW-600 was the last beta-SP camcorder that Sony built, probably it was introduced around 1990-ish?
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#3 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 04:44 PM

Can't find an exact date anywhere... This article:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Betacam

Suggests it must have been after 1986 (when Beta-SP was introduced) but before 1993 (when Digital Betacam was introduced.) Since the BVW-600 was the last beta-SP camcorder that Sony built, probably it was introduced around 1990-ish?


Hi David,

99% sure the 600 came after the 700 Digi Beta, it's basically a 700 that records to beta SP, the 700 was at least a year after the DigiBeta record decks so my money is on around 1995/6

Best Stephen

Edit I remember it was after the 700 by several months, I had been using the 700 for several months and wondered who on earth would want a 600 with drop outs that BCSP provided when it was first announced. Very few were sold in Europe.

In 1986 state of the art were tube cameras with Betacam recorders, Betacam SP came a couple of years later well after D1.
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#4 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 04:55 PM

Duplicate post which I can't delete!
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#5 Alex Lindblom

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 05:04 PM

Did some more digging and found a manual it says: 1 edition (revised 1) and it's printed in Japan 1994. 12. 13.

I guess that stands for December 1994, maybe we are a bit closer to an actual date.



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#6 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 June 2011 - 05:22 PM

Did some more digging and found a manual it says: 1 edition (revised 1) and it's printed in Japan 1994. 12. 13.

I guess that stands for December 1994, maybe we are a bit closer to an actual date.


The first 700 to arrive in Switzerland was late 95, I was at IBC in September 94 and neither 600 or 700 were there.
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#7 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 12:32 AM

The first 700 to arrive in Switzerland was late 95, I was at IBC in September 94 and neither 600 or 700 were there.


I talked to a Sony engineer today, he's guessing more like 1993 for BVW600 -- I don't think the BVW700 came out before the BVW600, I saw the 600 before the 700 in Los Angeles.
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#8 Alex Lindblom

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 02:16 AM

Thank you both for the info.
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#9 Stephen Williams

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 02:27 AM

I don't think the BVW700 came out before the BVW600, I saw the 600 before the 700 in Los Angeles.


Hi David,

That explains why the 600 was a flop in Europe, by the time it arrived there was no real reason to buy one.

Stephen
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#10 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 03:05 AM

I know someone who owned a BVW 600, the mid 90's sounds about right for it arriving in the UK.
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#11 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 12:27 PM

Can you explain what you mean by "drop outs". Are you implying that betacam sp had drop outs?   All tape formats have occasoinal drop outs, no?


 I had been using the 700 for several months and wondered who on earth would want a 600 with drop outs that BCSP provided when it was first announced. Very few were sold in Europe.


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#12 Stephen Williams

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 05:35 PM

Can you explain what you mean by "drop outs". Are you implying that betacam sp had drop outs?   All tape formats have occasoinal drop outs, no?

 

 

Drop outs on Beta SP were a nightmare, with the DigiBeta I never saw any, probably cleverly concealed.


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#13 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 03 April 2013 - 06:52 PM

Dropout compensation on Beta SP ranged from "subtle and useful" to "half the image is a vertical blur".

 

Digital signals are, by their nature, considerably more robust (that's the point). Magnetic storage formats typically include checksums which allow detection, and may to an extent allow recovery, of corrupted data. And in a format like Digital Betacam, which uses light 3:1 JPEG-style DCT compression, dropouts do not reach across lines; they may be limited to a few macroblocks, and dropout compensation is trivial as the frame is built into a digital frame store as a matter of course. If there's a problem decoding a block, it's quite common for a decoder simply to leave the same block in place from a previous frame, which is what all DV devices I've seen do, although any particular tape format or specific deck could choose a more elaborate approach.

 

 

 

 

What's interesting about all this is illustrated in one of the differences between DVCPRO and DVCAM tape. DVCPRO uses (or used) metal particle tape, which is less prone to dropouts, but was required to run that tape slower than DVCAM because the larger magnetic particles were capable of a lower information density. There is some argument to the effect that digital tape formats can achieve a much greater average information density than analogue ones. Analogue formats require peak high-frequency performance only where the picture is detailed, but must provide that performance all the time; whereas, the compression mathematics used by most digital formats can spread the high energy data around the entire tape, as required. This arguably made particle tape more practical; a 33-minute DVCPRO tape is far smaller (half the width and roughly a quarter the tape speed!) of Beta SP for the same or better quality.

 

P


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#14 steve waschka

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Posted 04 April 2013 - 01:59 AM

i currently use the d600. as well as 400's. when im worried about dropouts or shooting to a script i run a parallel deck and fresh tape in both. however i have read about dropout removal via desktop scripts. never tried them. never had a brand new bsp either. but ive had several carefully used ones. the blackline noise during playback in the viewfinder suggests there's a lot of compensation going on in all those boards inside.

 

that sounds negative... ill add that a good bsp camera is a trustworthy companion. and ive dropped a couple from 3ft up. tanks!


Edited by steve waschka, 04 April 2013 - 02:03 AM.

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