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Calculations for high frame rate shooting


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#1 Ross Neugeboren

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 10:55 AM

I'm considering shooting 600 feet of 16mm daylight stocks sitting in my fridge at a high frame rate to capture pump-track bicycle riders in slow motion. I was able to determine that at a frame rate of 60fps I would have 6:40 minutes of running time, but in referring to high frame rate shooting I had heard there is a difference between running time and real time. something like a second of screen time is x seconds in real time. Do any formulas exist to determine this compression of time? I fear that on 600 feet we don't want to roll out immediately, especially if we decide to go up to 100fps.

Any general tips about shooting outdoors at a high frame rate would be greatly appreciated, as well.

Thanks in advance,
Ross
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#2 Karl Eklund

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Posted 04 June 2011 - 09:51 PM

I'm considering shooting 600 feet of 16mm daylight stocks sitting in my fridge at a high frame rate to capture pump-track bicycle riders in slow motion. I was able to determine that at a frame rate of 60fps I would have 6:40 minutes of running time, but in referring to high frame rate shooting I had heard there is a difference between running time and real time. something like a second of screen time is x seconds in real time. Do any formulas exist to determine this compression of time? I fear that on 600 feet we don't want to roll out immediately, especially if we decide to go up to 100fps.

Any general tips about shooting outdoors at a high frame rate would be greatly appreciated, as well.

Thanks in advance,
Ross

Ok, if you shoot 100 FPS, I assume you are working in Pal, which is 25 FPS. What it means is that when "projected/viewed" it will take 4 seconds to play those 100 Frames that a second of real time gives you. But lets say you project that in 100 FPS, then it would take 1 second to view, real time.

100 FPS = 25% speed of real time when projecting at 25 FPS
50 FPS = 50% speed of real time when projecting at 25 FPS

At 100 FPS you would get about 4 mins.
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#3 Ross Neugeboren

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Posted 06 June 2011 - 10:26 PM

Hey Karl,
Makes sense, shooting framerate divided by projection framerate. Thanks!

-Ross
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Rig Wheels Passport

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rebotnix Technologies

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Aerial Filmworks

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Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

The Slider

Glidecam

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Technodolly

Opal