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Super 8 shutter speeds?


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#1 Ross Thompson

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 07:11 PM

Hey guys, I am new here, I am traditionally trained as a still photographer, so I apologize if my question seems a little naive..

I just got an Argus 802 super 8 camera, it's pretty basic and automatic, but you can set your aperture.. I know that it captures at 18 fps and I was wondering if there was any way that I could find the shutter speed that it runs so that I can light accordingly without having to do capture tests.

Thanks so much guys,

All the best,

Ross
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 07:40 PM

Hi Ross, I don't know the exact shutter speed. However as a general guide, the shutter angle is around 150 to 180 degrees for 18 fps for most super-8 cameras. If the camera says XL on it, then the shutter angle is usually between 190 degrees and 220 degrees.

On top of that, that bright viewfinder is a result of diverting some of the light from the film plane to the eyepiece. I don't know the exact amount of loss but I think 1/2 to 2/3's of a stop is a safe estimate to make.
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#3 Ross Thompson

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Posted 13 June 2011 - 08:04 PM

Hi Ross, I don't know the exact shutter speed. However as a general guide, the shutter angle is around 180 degrees for 18 fps for most super-8 cameras. If the camera says XL on it, then the shutter angle is usually between 190 degrees and 220 degrees.



Thanks! I should really just do a bracket exposure test with a controlled light setting... but it should be about 1/30s-1/36s
that helps a lot!

Thanks again,

Ross
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#4 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 14 June 2011 - 05:34 AM

At 18fps, many super 8 camera models have a shutter speed of about 1/48th of a second. Though as Alessandro mentioned, there will be some light loss that must be accounted for if using an external meter. I found a decent way of figuring out the exposre compensation required. Take a light reading with your super 8 camera and note the f stop reading. Then grab a 35mm SLR (or a hand held meter) and set the same f stop on that, then point the meter at the same subject and note the shutter speed setting that the meter recommends. Try this with a bunch of different subjects and if you get fairly consistent results (ie the stills meter usually displays the same shutter speed) then that is a good bet that you have cracked the code. Using this method, it's preferable that your stills meter's shutter speeds can be adjusted in half stops - for accuracy. If not, then when comparing your light readings, go through your various shutter speeds on the stills meter until the f stop displayed matches the one indicated with the super 8 camera.

Remember, if a tungsten based film is loaded in the super 8 camera in daylight with the 85 filter engaged, set the film's effective daylight asa setting on the stills meter. For example, if you're using Ektachrome 64T, set 40asa on the stills meter. And if you're using this film in artificial lighting without the filter, then you would set 64asa.
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