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Motion slide film


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#1 Marvin Yun

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 02:48 AM

I recently noticed that Fuji has the ETERNA-CP series films which is the "color positive film". Such as: ETERNA-CP 3521XD. Any one used that series of "positive film?" Never seen in stocks market. Is it similar to the color slide film such as 100D 5285/7285?

Ref: http://www.fujifilm....ducts/#positive
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#2 John Holland

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 03:16 AM

Its Motion Picture Print stock . Neg to Pos.
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 07:38 PM

IFuji has the ETERNA-CP series "color positive film". Such as: ETERNA-CP 3521XD.


This series is the film that is used in a projector. (many theatres have not installed digial projection and still use real film.)

A printing negative is made either by using a digital recorder, or more traditionaly by making a copy using intermediate films from the original negative shot in the camera, and a print is made on "positive film" for each theatre.

Traditional editing also used this to make a "work print" from the camera negative for the editor to use to find the right place to make each cut. Once everyone was comforatble with the Cut Work print, a specialist would cut the original negative to match.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 07:45 PM

Technically print film is also a "negative" stock -- you are basically creating a negative image of a negative, thus a positive image. But there is no brick-orange color mask and the contrast (gamma) is designed for projection.

Only reversal stocks (like slide film) create positive images from positive originals (or reality) because during processing, the density is reversed between the highlights and the shadows. On negative film, the most exposure causes the most density to be formed on the negative and the least exposure causes the least amount of density to be created.
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#5 Hal Smith

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 08:05 PM

Only reversal stocks (like slide film) create positive images from positive originals (or reality) because during processing, the density is reversed between the highlights and the shadows. On negative film, the most exposure causes the most density to be formed on the negative and the least exposure causes the least amount of density to be created.


I usually learn from, not disagree with, you David on anything having to do with film but I beg to differ. The "reversal" description comes from one of the processing steps.

Back in my youth when (silly me) I actually processed B&W Super-8 reversal film I had shot, the second exposure to light was called the reversal step.

The first exposure came in the camera and the second came after I had developed the intial negative on the surface of the film and was exposing it to plain white light, thus printing it to a lower level of light sensitive emulsion creating a latent positive image. After that, I bleached the top layer negative off and developed the second image, giving me a positive projection print (after washing, fixing, etc).

I got pretty good at it though I had a reticulation problem (my films tended to look like they had been shot though an old fashioned tile bathroom floor) which many years later I learned was because I had little, or no, temperature control. The reticulation actually gave a quite artistic look to my work but I was more interested in creating realistic looking films of miniatures. Years later a guy named George Lucas came along and stole my techniques making a little film called "Star Wars" (not really but it makes a good story :D ).

PS: The fact that reversal film is really just negative film with perhaps a thicker emulsion layer is why you can cross process it as a negative. The nature of the reversal process is also why if you want a REALLY different look, you can reversal process a negative film.
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#6 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 08:36 PM

I usually learn from, not disagree with, you David on anything having to do with film but I beg to differ. The "reversal" description comes from one of the processing steps.

Back in my youth when (silly me) I actually processed B&W Super-8 reversal film I had shot, the second exposure to light was called the reversal step.

The first exposure came in the camera and the second came after I had developed the intial negative on the surface of the film and was exposing it to plain white light, thus printing it to a lower level of light sensitive emulsion. After that, I bleached the top layer negative off, giving me a positive projection print (after washing, fixing, etc).

I got pretty good at it though I had a reticulation problem (my films tended to look like they had been shot though an old fashioned tile bathroom floor) which many years later I learned was because I had little, or no, temperature control. The reticulation actually gave a quite artistic look to my work but I was more interested in creating realistic looking films of miniatures. Years later a guy named George Lucas came along and stole my techniques making a little film called "Star Wars" (not really but it makes a good story :D ).

PS: The fact that reversal film is really just negative film with perhaps a thicker emulsion layer is why you can cross process it as a negative. The nature of the reversal process is also why if you want a REALLY different look, you can reversal process a negative film.


I'm not sure why that description makes mine wrong -- with reversal processing, the second exposure, the bleaching, etc. all basically reverse the density levels from the original negative image, turning it into a positive image where shadows have density instead of highlights. Anyway, for a more detailed description:

http://en.wikipedia....rsal_processing
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#7 Hal Smith

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Posted 26 June 2011 - 11:09 PM

I'm not sure why that description makes mine wrong -- with reversal processing, the second exposure, the bleaching, etc. all basically reverse the density levels from the original negative image, turning it into a positive image where shadows have density instead of highlights. Anyway, for a more detailed description:


I'm differing in opinion where the term "reversal" came from...you're absolutely right about the density reversal that happens. Once again I mourn our loss of John Pytlak, this was the kind of discussion he'd wade into with precisely the correct answer(s) from his long experience on the technical/engineering side at Kodak.
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