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Bolex 16 pro how to unload?


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#1 James collins

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Posted 28 June 2011 - 04:02 PM

Hello,

Wondered if anyone knew how, or had a step by step description on how to unload a bolex 16 pro?

I have got done shooting a 400 ft roll of film but could use some help unloading it.

Anyway any help would be appreciated. Also if anyone knows where I could get a owners manual in English that would be great.

Thanks in advance.
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#2 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 03:35 AM

It's pretty straight forward, much like unloading any co-axial mag (without a collapsible core): open the take-up door, secure the footage counter lever out of the way and lift the film on its core out of the mag (in a change bag or dark room obviously).

If you managed to figure out how to load, thread and shoot with the thing, unloading it should be a cinch!

Is there a particular aspect you're unsure of?
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#3 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 03:45 AM

If you can get a copy of the older (1981) edition of "Professional Cameraman's Handbook" by Verna & Sylvia Carlson, they cover the 16 Pro. Rather curiously they don't have the Aaton in that edition.
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#4 James collins

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 09:28 AM

Dom,

What does the footage counter look like? Is it inside the magazine?

I think I can get the magazine off the camera body, then I am going to turn the little triangular shaped thing, so I can turn the cover of the magazine off.

Then I will move the footage counter out of the way, I have a booklet in German with pictures. It shows the inside of the magazine, but then I can just pull the film right out?

Never unloaded a magazine on any camera before, just don't want to damage something.
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#5 Will Montgomery

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 10:56 AM

What does the footage counter look like? Is it inside the magazine?

It's probably an arm with a roller on the end that just rests on the film and moves up and down. However, on that magazine the counter arm might be on the loading side, not the unloading side so it may not even be there... if it is, just pull it back from the film.

...but then I can just pull the film right out?

Inside the changing bag just flip the mag over and the film should just slip off into your hands with the core in place... maybe give it a gentle nudge until it slips off with gravity's help.
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#6 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 29 June 2011 - 10:26 PM

James,

the footage counter is on the back of the mag - there are actually 2 counters, one telling you how much film is left, the other telling you how much has been exposed. It works due to the spring-loaded wire levers inside the mag cavities that rest against the film. The Pro is unusual in that it has one for the feed side and also one for the take-up. When loading and unloading you just push them to the edge and they lock behind a stud. Perhaps when you loaded they were already secured at the edge, and you didn't notice them. They need to be unlatched once the film is loaded. (There's also a footage counter on the top of the camera, but that works off the camera movement.)

To remove the mag you turn the ring above the mag port til it locks in position. Hold the mag while you do this or it'll fall off. The film needs to have been run all the way through the camera into the take-up cavity of the mag. Then yes, turn the little star lock to undo the mag door. The take-up side lock has felt on it to identify it in the change bag.

The film core should just lift off the spindle, though there is some friction keeping it in place. Did you fit a core to the take-up spindle before loading and threading, or was one already fitted?

Unless you have money to burn it's generally a very good idea to practice with a dummy roll of old film before shooting with fresh stock. You can also keep all the doors open and see exactly what the camera's doing (or possibly not doing).

Good luck!
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