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Nizo S55 and 100D Film


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#1 Takahiro Suzuki

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 05:23 PM

I have a Nizo S55 camera, and I've shot some of the new Ektachrome 100D stock on it once almost a year back, and I remember the footage looking a bit underexposed.

Can that camera read the notching for that stock to properly expose it? Or should I look to have it pushed a stop or two?

Also, I read somewhere that on Nizo cameras the new 100D stock needs to be on the Tungsten setting, rather than the Daylight setting. Is that true also? I'm guess if it is, the camera thinks it's the 64T Ektachrome stock (but that should slightly overexpose the 100D stock...not underexpose it...)

If someone can give me any information it would be helpful.

Thanks,
Taka
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#2 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 09:07 PM

That camera has manual exposure so why not just get an external light meter and then you don't have to worry what the camera rates the film at?

And yes, the camera needs to be on tungsten if doing daylight because tungsten = no filter.
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#3 Takahiro Suzuki

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 10:38 PM

That camera has manual exposure so why not just get an external light meter and then you don't have to worry what the camera rates the film at?

And yes, the camera needs to be on tungsten if doing daylight because tungsten = no filter.


With my Super8 camera, I like to be mobile and just shoot (like 35mm street photography), so I was trying to see if there was any trick to keep it on auto and still get proper exposure, but seems like manual metering is my best bet (as it always is).
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#4 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 05 July 2011 - 11:06 PM

Well, I have pointed out on here before that even if everything meters correctly, there can sometimes be a problem with using auto-meters. This is because the metering can constantly change which can make the film look sortof flickery when your footage comes back from the telecine house. Whereas by manually exposing, it has more of a natural look because its got one meter setting...just like your eyes do :)
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#5 Jamie Frazer Noakes

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 01:20 AM

I have a Nizo S55 camera, and I've shot some of the new Ektachrome 100D stock on it once almost a year back, and I remember the footage looking a bit underexposed.

Can that camera read the notching for that stock to properly expose it? Or should I look to have it pushed a stop or two?

Also, I read somewhere that on Nizo cameras the new 100D stock needs to be on the Tungsten setting, rather than the Daylight setting. Is that true also? I'm guess if it is, the camera thinks it's the 64T Ektachrome stock (but that should slightly overexpose the 100D stock...not underexpose it...)

If someone can give me any information it would be helpful.

Thanks,
Taka


Hi Taka!

To shoot 100D with your Nizo you need to leave the filter setting on 'Sun' (Daylight) - the camera removes the filter automaticaly - but you get the 100 ISO/ASA setting.

If you remove the filter manually so that the 'lamp' setting is showing then the camera will read the stock as 160 ISO/ASA and therefore underexpose it by 2/3rds of a stop.

Hope this helps

Jamie
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#6 Jamie Frazer Noakes

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 01:30 AM

With my Super8 camera, I like to be mobile and just shoot (like 35mm street photography), so I was trying to see if there was any trick to keep it on auto and still get proper exposure, but seems like manual metering is my best bet (as it always is).


You will get proper exposure by using auto! - But what you can do is use the auto meter as a spot / incident meter and then lock the exposure.

Running with auto is fine - you just need to get used to the way the auto exposure works on your Nizo - I have found that on the Nizos they are more biased to the brighter areas and therefore darken everything else. Just avoid to many high contrasting light sources and of course reflected bright spots and glints.

I prefer to work with the onboard meter as it is calibrated to the light lost during transmission through the lens elements and viewfinder. You can use an external light meter if you wish - but I feel it is unecessary. However some like to work this way and find it works for them and I have no problem with that!
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#7 Matthew W. Phillips

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 03:00 AM

If you remove the filter manually so that the 'lamp' setting is showing then the camera will read the stock as 160 ISO/ASA and therefore underexpose it by 2/3rds of a stop.


Therefore, it would be good to do just that and manually adjust it 1/3 higher since reversal film actually looks best at 1/3 stop underexposed. At least this is my opinion and that of a few others around here. Remember, overexpose negative film and underexpose positive film. ;)
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Ritter Battery

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

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The Slider

CineTape

Aerial Filmworks

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Wooden Camera

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

FJS International, LLC

Glidecam

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS