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#1 John Sprung

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Posted 06 July 2011 - 12:22 PM

Some of the major studios and unions are working together to support legislation that targets bogus web sites selling stolen IP back into the USA:

http://www.creativeamerica.org./





-- J.S.
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#2 Richard Boddington

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 05:13 PM

I seriously hope this happens:

"But right now, the U.S. Senate is considering legislation that could make a real difference in the fight against content theft by giving U.S. law enforcement the authority to shut down foreign websites that traffic stolen American movies and TV shows."

It would finally cripple the scum bags in Russia and Eastern Europe.

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#3 K Borowski

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 06:01 PM

Anyone that isn't for us on this is against us! My own sisters, Phil Rhodes (ahem ahem), sorry, but I swear (and I told her) if I catch my sister with pirated material I'll hit her with a lead pipe, and on the follow through hit Phil.

Piracy affects US (non actors directors) first with budget cuts. Have any friends pirating movies? Threaten to turn them in. It's not a joke. It's not as innocent as pirating music (I do it, but buy the vinyl too, so I am not an average consumer in any regard).

A movie takes an army of people. It's not 8 hours in a recording studio (no offense intended to audio engineers), it's eight weeks out in much, cold, heat, filth, dangerous conditions. Let everyone who thinks it should be free know about this, after you've reported them!

I give a free warning first, but I've almost gotten in fist fights a few times this makes my blood boil so much, movie piracy, ESPECIALLY when the damned things haven't been released on home movies yet. What kills me, some a$$hole on the INSIDE is doing this stuff, pirating it, someone in the lab, in the editing room, in a screening room. They're like Alaskan wolves licking an Eskimo blade, not realising they are drinking their own blood and killing themselves.
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 08:01 PM

I think the most effective counter to piracy would be for the studios to provide a well priced, reliable, high-quality alternative. They could actually use the peer-to-peer networks to do it, diffusing the bandwidth requirements and reducing costs. It's important that such an alternative is not unreasonably encumbered with restrictions; itunes is a model here and is a significant profit centre both for content creators and for the people who run it. With ringing irony, the music piracy that endures generally justifies itself by providing somewhat higher technical quality than itunes, using media extracted from CDs. Because of this, although itunes' DRM has long since been cracked wide open, its files are not widely pirated.

Either way, I think history will laugh uproariously at the current attitude to online movie sales and show that it is costing the industry a fortune, quite apart from the tendency of a convenient, legal alternative to reduce piracy.


Not that we shouldn't take steps to minimise piracy, but trying to fight it by enacting evermore draconian laws and by providing ever more restricted and encumbered media to the people who do pay for it is doomed to fail, in exactly the same way that anti-drug legislation fails.

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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 07 July 2011 - 09:05 PM

Sure, I'd like to see reasonably priced legal online alternatives to the pirates. The rub on the "reasonably priced" part is, their production costs are a bunch less than ours, because they steal what we paid for.

As I understand it, this legislation isn't a massive draconian thing. It's quite specific to bogus sites outside the U.S. selling stolen IP into the U.S. -- kinda far down in the underbrush of legal detail, actually. If it gives law enforcement specific tools for that, I'm for it.




-- J.S.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:02 PM

Phil: Are you talking about 99 cent movie downloads? If so, that price structure is laughable with a 200 million dollar movie.

Should studios also simultaneously release online when running theatrical prints around? Because that is the stuff I threaten to report: Movies that aren't even for sale yet for the home theatre being bootlegged around the streets of NYC for $5.


Disgusting! Brazen!
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#7 Ben Syverson

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 12:52 PM

I haven't bought a movie in years, because there's no acceptable way for me to do it. I still go to see movies in the theater, and stream via Netflix, but I'm quickly losing the desire to "own" a movie.

At this point, I'm not going to buy a DVD, because it's not HD.

I'm not going to buy a BluRay, because my 5 year old projector is "too old" for the DRM, and my MacBook doesn't read the disks.

I'm not going to buy the movie from iTunes, because 1080 is cut down to 720, and there are no bonus features.

I would be happy to pay $15-25 for a download if it was on par with the BluRay. It would cost the studios less than pressing a disk.
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#8 Richard Boddington

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 01:40 PM

I think the most effective counter to piracy would be for the studios to provide a well priced, reliable, high-quality alternative.


Nothing beats, free.

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#9 Richard Boddington

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 01:46 PM

Don't we have the technology to build a program into a DVD that will infect the users computer with a "fatal" virus if the files are being used to create an illegal download?

Put a warning on the DVD stating that the DVD has the ability to destroy a computer if it is used improperly. Nothing would make me happier than to see a bootleggers entire computer system wiped out by a virus.

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#10 Ben Syverson

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 01:56 PM

Put a warning on the DVD stating that the DVD has the ability to destroy a computer if it is used improperly

My humor detector must be off today. Are you being serious? Because I'm sure it's obvious to everyone that this would lead to fewer disk sales, not more. I would switch to downloading illegally, because it would be safer than risking my production system.

If my computer was wiped out because of the twisted logic in some movie studio spyware, I can't even tell you how many lawsuits I would file.

Edited by Ben Syverson, 08 July 2011 - 01:57 PM.

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#11 Richard Boddington

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 03:53 PM

If my computer was wiped out because of the twisted logic in some movie studio spyware, I can't even tell you how many lawsuits I would file.


It would happen only if you where being naughty, plus there would be a warning label on the DVD telling you not to try and crack the DVD and upload it.

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#12 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 04:01 PM

It would happen only if you where being naughty




It's already happened - Sony did something which was designed to make PCs unable to play a CD release of theirs.


Of course, they were found not liable for damaging people's machines, that's how corporate America works - but it's an astonishingly bad idea. Exactly the sort of thing that gives pirates ammunition.


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#13 Ben Syverson

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 05:28 PM

It would happen only if you where being naughty, plus there would be a warning label on the DVD telling you not to try and crack the DVD and upload it.

"Naughty" according to whom? As a software engineer, I know how impossible it is to completely remove all bugs for every edge case. That means this software would wipe out a certain percentage of innocent hard drives.

Why not just ship the movie with some plastic explosive that's triggered when the user opens Bittorrent? Would that increase sales?
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#14 Richard Boddington

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Posted 08 July 2011 - 11:14 PM

Why not just ship the movie with some plastic explosive that's triggered when the user opens Bittorrent? Would that increase sales?


I like how you think, will this be ready in time before my next movie comes out on DVD?

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#15 Ben Syverson

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Posted 09 July 2011 - 04:04 AM

I like how you think, will this be ready in time before my next movie comes out on DVD?

Heh heh...You know, I can't get too worked up by anyone who quotes the one of the greatest movie lines ever in their sig. Somehow, an exploding movie fits right into the Donnie Darko world, too. :)
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