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Any truly color accurate LED panels out there?


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#1 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 05:30 AM

The few times I have been around LED's, the green spike or blue leaning color issues were unacceptable. Two weeks ago I was on a doc/interview shoot that was using some (from China probably) and the skin tones on the RED's monitor were very green.

Has Litepanels or anyone else managed to get this under control in your experience?
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#2 Albert Smith

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 09:26 AM

The few times I have been around LED's, the green spike or blue leaning color issues were unacceptable. Two weeks ago I was on a doc/interview shoot that was using some (from China probably) and the skin tones on the RED's monitor were very green.

Has Litepanels or anyone else managed to get this under control in your experience?



Had same problems all the time with the knock off's I don't think I have ever used the real "litepanels" I would assume they are accurate or hope so.


just get those 1/8 +- ready....but sometimes its hard to pinpoint.
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#3 Guy Holt

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 07:53 PM

The few times I have been around LED's, the green spike or blue leaning color issues were unacceptable. Has Litepanels or anyone else managed to get this under control in your experience?


No, I don’t know of a LED Fixture using Phosphor White LEDs that is able to render color accurately. The problem is that, given the discontinuous nature of their spectral output, they simply are not capable of rendering colors accurately – that includes the Litepanels. If you compare the spectral power distribution graphs of LEDs below to that of a Tungsten source you can see why.

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A spectral power distribution of a lamp indicates how much energy is present in each part of the spectrum. As you can see above, Tungsten lamps have a continuous spectrum. Given how they produce white light, even high CRI Phosphor White LEDS have a discontinuous spectral quality that is unlike that of Tungsten lights. In the case of the 3200K Phosphor White LEDs above, the phosphors added shape the spectral distribution by enhancing certain colors in the spectrum to simulate the spectral distribution of incandescent light. As a result, the spectral distribution of Phosphor White LEDs resembles a series of peaks and valleys. There is a big spike at about 465nm (the blue LED) and a broader bump between 500 and 700nm produced by the phosphors. Even though the spectral power distribution has these peaks and valleys, the human eye perceives the light as white light.

While the discontinuous spectral distribution of high CRI Phosphor White LEDS may appear white to the eye, and the color of objects illuminated by it appear natural to the eye, to film emulsions and digital imaging systems designed to reproduce accurate color under continuous spectrum light sources (like daylight or incandescent lamps), the color of the same objects will appear unnatural on screen (as the illustrations below make clear.) That is, the hue of an object being illuminated by this "white light" can be drastically different than expected when it appears on the screen. For example, below is a "Macbeth chart" contrasting the resulting effect upon different color swatches of studio tungsten light and a representative high CRI Phosphor White LED lighting instrument.

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Split Macbeth chart: each color patch shows the visible effects of studio tungsten light in the top half of the patch, and a representative Phosphor White LED lighting instrument in the bottom half.


A common test chart used for assessing color performance of motion picture imaging systems, the chart above would be more accurately called a "split Macbeth chart" because each color patch shows the visible effects of the two light sources; studio tungsten in the top half of the patch, and the Phosphor White LED instrument in the bottom half. Although your computer display is not likely to be a calibrated reference monitor, the wide variations in color patch hue caused by the discontinuous spectral distribution of the Phosphor White LED should be readily apparent.

What accounts for these results? First, as you can see from its' spectral power distribution above, Phosphor White LEDS, compared to continuous light sources, have no output at wavelengths shorter than about 425nm, which means that violet colors don't render well. Second, there is minimal output in the medium blue-cyan-turquoise range from about 465-510nm, which is why the aqua-type colors don't render well either. Third, with the long-wavelengths cutoff in the high-600 nm range, pinks, reds, oranges, and other long wave-length colors tend to look a little dull under Phosphor White LEDs, compared with how they look under continuous spectrum light sources (daylight, HMI, Tungsten) which extend all the way out on the long-wavelength end. Lacking these long wavelength colors within the spectrum, skin tones tend to look a little pale. Finally, as you can see from the gray scale at the bottom, this particular Phosphor White LED Luminary has an overall magenta bias. While you can white balance out/time out this magenta bias in digital video cameras/digital film intermediate, the camera/timer is not able to replace the parts of the spectrum that are missing all together. And since gels only rebalance the spectral distribution of a light source by passing the wavelength of the color that they are, gels cannot correct for these deficiencies because there is not much light of those wavelengths to pass in Phosphor White LEDs to begin with.

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Left: Tungsten source, Right: White Phosphor LED source.


This inability of Phosphor White LEDs to render color accurately is very visible in tests recently performed by The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) as part of their “Solid State Lighting Project Technical Assessment.” (see http://www.screenlig... Output AC LEDs for details.) In one (above) a model was photographed wearing a dress that had a number of different blue tints. Footage was shot with both a true tungsten source and a White Phosphor LED source. The tungsten-lit footage displayed all of the subtle differences in blue tones in the fabric, while the LED-lit footage, lacking cyan output, showed just a nice blue dress, without the same richness of hue. Since the light doesn’t put out much cyan, the camera/film simply can’t record it.

The same holds true of flesh tones illuminated by LED light. As is also evident in the pictures above, skin tones don’t reproduce well under LED lights because of the steep drop off of high frequency colors (above the 600nm cut off) such as pinks, reds, oranges, and other long wave-length colors. As the illustration below, comparing the reflected spectral distribution of a Caucasian skin tone under theoretical pure white light (an even distribution of all wavelengths) to that of a Phosphor White LED demonstrates, absent these wavelengths the skin tones look pale under LEDs because light reflected by the skin tone is likewise absent these critical long wavelength colors.

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Reflected Spectral Distribution of Caucasian skin tone under theoretical White Light and Phosphor White LED Light


In the picture above illuminated by the Phosphor White LED, both the cyan/blue dress and the skin tone, don’t reproduce well because you can't get accurate color reflected from an object unless that color is in the light in the first place. In other words, if the light source doesn’t generate the color (cyan), it is not reflected by the object (the dress) and so the camera/film simply can’t record it. And, as Cinematographer Daryn Okada, ASC, discovered the hard way, color gel packs, camera white balance, or digital intermediate timing can’t bring it out if it isn’t there to begin with.

Like many of us, Daryn Okada uses LEDs as “touch up” lights to add a little something where key lights don’t cover. Needing to touch up a face on one talent mark, he once hid a small LED unit behind a chair, to add some glow to an actress’s face when she reached a mark where the keys had fallen off. “The manufacturer claimed the unit to be a ‘tungsten LED source’” he recounts. “She stopped right in the doorway, where I had this LED, and looked fine. But when I got the dailies back, her face was totally magenta.”; What’s worse, Okada says the image could not be repaired in post, because there wasn’t enough of the right color of light in the scanned negative for a color timer to bring out. This is a good example of the fact that, the bottom line is that, simply by nature of their discontinuous spectral distribution, even high CRI Phosphor White LEDs will never accurately reproduce colors on screen regardless what can be done in post. To make matters worse, common color meters, like the Minolta III F, are completely useless with LEDs in determining what gels to use. The meter makes its calculation of the color temperature based on an assumption that the light source has a continuous spectrum. Color readings of an LED have been shown to be misleading for both correlated color temperature and green/magenta shift. And, manufacturer’s CRI ratings are not necessarily the best indicator to judge the color rendering capability of LED fixtures because it is a measurement that can be messaged by manufacturers to give high readings without giving good results.

You have to be wary of all the claims made by LED head manufacturers. Whenever a new lighting technology comes on the market, the manufacturers put a little spin on the scientific data which has a tendency to cloud issues. For this reason, to pick the right LED luminary for a particular job it helps to have a thorough understanding of the technology. For our company newsletter I have put together an overview of the technology and what LED products are available for motion picture lighting (available at http://www.screenlig... Output AC LEDs.)

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental and Sales in Boston
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#4 Ben Syverson

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 08:13 PM

Guy, this is another phenomenal post. I've been saving these to my hard drive for future reference. Fantastic information in there.
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#5 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 08:39 PM

Wow Guy, now that's a reply. The width of the graphics makes for a frustrating read however, having to pan my screen back and forth.

I had a feeling that even the newest LED's still don't hold up when trying to get a pleasing skin tone.

I was asking because I'm doing some rough budgeting of a high-end doc project that I may be producing later this year.

There are certain interview pieces that I want shot on S16mm and tungsten sources seem to be the only choice to get what I feel is acceptable.

Im trying to design a very small/efficient lighting and camera package as this shoot goes to extremely remote areas at times, with a two man crew:
Aaton prod, a RED Epic (or Canon's new 4K cam?) and two small lights.

The non-interview stuff is outdoors and natural light only, and is 80% of it.

I was also considering a Kino or Mole Biax but maybe a 1K Arri soft box set-up as a key will still be the most reliable in terms of color/quality of light.
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#6 K Borowski

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Posted 15 July 2011 - 09:39 PM

Guy, thanks for the excellent info. Width of the screen is irrelevant, IMO, when such excellent information is presented. Guy should make money with such a well-written piece, and someone lay it out for him in the book!


I'm glad to hear it from you rather than getting burned by LED lights myself! I thought these lights were spectrally pure, solving a lot of the problems with common CFLs. Disappointing to see they have a lot of maturing to do as well. This has to do with the peak responses being off from where film, HD sensitivities lie?



Don't have time to disseminate your post in full, but I'd supposit that, since there aren't gaps in the spectrum, there ought to be exposure compensations that should make it a simple matter to pull information back out. In Okada's case, he must have severely underexposed the green layer to the point that it didn't develop to a usable density above D-min of the film. Like shooting tungsten film in daylight conditions, or vice versa without filtration, as long as there is adequate red, green blue exposures to render decent dye density on the neg., it should be correctable.

My understanding was that only commercial fluoros (with the exception of Fuji Films with the cyan inter-layer) or spectrally deficient light like mercury vapor sodium vapor were completely uncorrectable even with overexposure.
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#7 Guy Holt

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 03:35 PM

just get those 1/8 +- ready....but sometimes its hard to pinpoint.


Good luck trying to correct the deficiencies of LED panels with gels. Even the better LED light panels, like the Litepanels, are so deficit in certain parts of the color spectrum that by the time you came up with a color gel pack to match them to a continuous light source like a tungsten or HMI light, the LED panel would put out very little light with all those gels on it. And, to make matters worse, common color meters, like the Minolta III F, are completely useless with LEDs in determining what gels to use. The meter makes its calculation of the color temperature based on an assumption that the light source has a continuous spectrum. Color readings of an LED have been shown to be misleading for both correlated color temperature and green/magenta shift.

It is also a common mistake to think that a custom camera white balance can correct for the deficiencies of LEDs in every situation. Take Daryn Okada’s situation I gave as an example above. Had Daryn Okada been shooting with a digital video camera, he would have noticed the off color of the LED source immediately. But, given the limited spectral output of LEDs, his ability to remedy the problem would have been limited. If he white balanced the camera for the LED source, the background of the room beyond the doorway that was lit by tungsten lights would turn very green. In a mixed light situation such as this, the only alternative is to match the LED source to the prevalent tungsten source with a custom gel pack on the LED head. But, since gels rebalance the spectral distribution of a light source by passing the wavelength of the color that they are, gels cannot correct for these deficiencies either because there is not much light of those wavelengths to pass in White Phosphor LEDs to begin with. In other words, White Phosphor LEDS are so deficit in certain parts of the color spectrum that by the time you came up with a color gel pack to match them to a continuous light source like a tungsten light, the LED panel would put out very little light with all those gels on it.

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To understand why this is so, we need only look at a similar situation: the conversion of tungsten light to daylight using full CTB gel. As you can see in the Spectral Power Distribution graph of tungsten light above, tungsten light is so deficient in the blue part of the spectrum that it takes a quite saturated blue gel to balance it to daylight. In fact, the transmission coefficient of some full CTB gels is only 24%, which means that it passes only 24% of the source (see below.) That is why gelling tungsten lights is a very inefficient way to create a daylight source (a tungsten 1000w gelled with CTB becomes a 240W daylight source.)

Posted Image


As you can see from the Spectral Power Distribution graph of the White Phosphor LED light above left, a gel pack that would match it to tungsten light would have to include a violet gel to extend its’ spectral output below 425nm. It would have to include medium blue, cyan, and turquoise gels to fill in the missing wavelengths from 465-510nm. Finally it would have to include pink, red, and orange gels to extend its’ spectral output beyond its’ 600nm cut-off. All of these gels would have to be quite saturated, since there is very little, if any, output of these wavelengths in White Phosphor LEDs to begin with. Imagine how much light you will get out of a LED light panel with such a gel pack (LED light panels put out barely enough to begin with, and have no output to waste to such accurate color correction.) Since, under most circumstances it is simply not feasible to completely match LED sources to tungsten sources with a gel pack, in mixed light situations such as these you are left, without recourse, with the off color generated by LEDs.

Posted Image
Left: Tungsten source, Right: White Phosphor LED source.


If the actress in Daryn Okada’s shot were the model in the blue/cyan dress above, you can imagine what would happen when she stepped onto the mark lit only with the LED source by looking closely at the contrasting photos above. Since, under the circumstances, Daryn Okada could not white balance for the LED source (and it would not be feasible to match the LED source with a gel pack) the rich blue/cyan hue of her dress in the left photo would turn into the simple blue of the right photo. The vibrant skin tone of the left photo would turn into the flat skin tone of the right photo, and it would have an overall magenta cast to boot.

The bottom line is that color gel packs, camera white balance, or digital intermediate timing can’t bring out a color if it isn’t there to begin with. Simply by nature of their discontinuous spectral distribution, even high CRI Phosphor White LEDs will never accurately reproduce colors on screen regardless what you do on set or in post. For more details, see my newsletter article on LEDs.

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental and Sales in Boston
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#8 John Sprung

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Posted 18 July 2011 - 05:40 PM

Good luck trying to correct the deficiencies of LED panels with gels.


Yup. Worse yet, you can't just make up whatever spectral transmission curve you want with gels. You're limited to the curves that are available from real world dyes. It has to do with the bonds in big molecules. Sharp cuts are difficult to make, especially in the blues and greens.





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#9 Guy Holt

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 02:44 PM

I was asking because I'm doing some rough budgeting of a high-end doc project that I may be producing later this year.... Im trying to design a very small/efficient lighting and camera package as this shoot goes to extremely remote areas at times, with a two man crew: I was also considering a Kino or Mole Biax but maybe a 1K Arri soft box set-up as a key will still be the most reliable in terms of color/quality of light.


You might want to consider Kino Flo Barfly fixtures. They aren’t much bigger than the 1x1 LED panels, put out a lot more light, can be lamped daylight or tungsten, and offer much better color rendition - especially when it comes to flesh tones which is critical when shooting interviews. A distinct advantage to Kino Flos over LED panels is that their discontinuous color spectrum can be easily corrected with gels, LEDs can not. Which makes Kino Flos, in my opinion, a better key source for documentary interviews because they will render flesh-tones better. Once the green spike of Kino-Flo’s True Match tubes have been corrected by the application of minus green (magenta) gels, the resulting spectral distribution is nearly continuous and contains a greater proportion of the long wave length colors that are so critical to rendering flesh-tones accurately (see illustration below.)

Posted Image


As can be seen clearly in the side-by-side comparisons in my newsletter article, skin-tones are significantly altered by the steep drop-off of long wavelength colors in LED light sources. Kino-Flo’s high CRI True-Match tubes, on the other hand, contain sufficient light in that critical part of the spectrum to render skin-tones realistically.

Posted Image


Once corrected for their green spike, Kino Flo True Match tubes provide a nearly full spectrum source capable of rendering flesh tones realistically. With Phosphor White LEDs, it is nearly impossible to correct for their deficiencies with gels (use this link to see side-by-side comparisons.)

A second distinction is that while the out-put of both sources depreciate overtime, when you reach low light failure of a Kino Tube after 2500hrs you can simply replace the tube. Since the cause of lumen depreciation in LED litepanels has to do with degeneration of the complete system, the remedy is not as simple. Since it is nearly impossible, even in the best designed LED luminaries, to completely protect against system degeneration, the lumen maintenance of an LED luminary is significantly less than the 50’000 hrs given by manufacturers for a single diode. For example, recent tests from the Caliper program (US Dept. of Energy) suggest that the lumen output of many LED luminaries depreciate to less than 50% after only 500hrs (see page 27 of the summary for examples of lumen depreciation after about 500 hours.) While, this might not be representative of every LED product, the vast majority of those that were tested fell far short of the manufacturers claims of lumen maintenance over 50’000hrs.

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When you take into account all the factors that can cause lumen depreciation and color shift over time, the useable lamp life of Phosphor White LED luminaries designed for motion picture lighting applications are probably no more than 1500 hrs. Since these types of LED fixtures generally have no interchangeable parts that can be replaced after reaching low-light failure, after 1500 hrs the fixture can only be thrown away (use this link for more details.) With Kinos you can simply replace the tubes.

- Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental & Sales in Boston.
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#10 John Sprung

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 02:58 PM

Since these types of LED fixtures generally have no interchangeable parts that can be replaced after reaching low-light failure, after 1500 hrs the fixture can only be thrown away .


You can always throw 'em my way -- I like to tinker with movie junk.... ;-)




-- J.S.
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#11 Jaron Berman

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 09:40 PM

Accurate vs. pleasing is another story. i dislike the look of litepanels 1x1, though they are used EVERYWHERE for a couple good reasons - they are fast to set up, and they can be battery powered. Will tungsten look better on skin? Yes. In many cases however, speed is more important than chart accuracy. I have a couple of the new Arri Locasters and I absolutely LOVE them. I think they look FAR better on skin than the 1x1, and its significantly easier to match them to any ambient light. When using the locasters, I pull a custom WB on the ambient, then use a vectorscope to match the Locaster to it exactly - the casters have variable "color temp" and +- green - it takes about 10 seconds with a scope to match them to just about anything, and I find the light to be very pleasing (and FAR easier on talents' eyes than the multi-point light of 1x1). They make an intensifier accessory - looke like a breakdown hard-side softbox...(dont know a better way to describe) that I like to skin with opal - and while intense, the light doesn't bother talent even when close-up and bright. Of the currently available LED's, I think the Locasters are by far the best. Output isn't anything to write home about, I think they're a little brighter than a bare 1x1, but the functionality is much better, and they're cheaper than 1x1 to boot. They can also be battery powered, though the available Anton mount is a little wonky - from the factory it doesn't allow you to use the fixture vertically...I drilled and tapped holes lower oin the yoke and to the back so the battery counterweights the head, so I can use flimsier travel stands if necessary (and use the fixture vertically). I use the light more than any other I own because it's convenient, fast, looks good and runs off battery or 4-pin XLR 12-28v. It really is an awesome light. I agree with guy about Kinos though - a lot of video engineers actually paint cameras to Chroma DuMonde charts using the Kino KF32 tubes, so obviously they must be pretty accurate. The barfly is a GREAT light, but in a pinch, I'll take the slightly-less-accurate (VERY slight difference, I've shot charts side-by-side to see) every time.

My only real gripe about the Locaster is that the system case is awful. It doesn't fit the system! If you have the anton mounts or intensifiers you need to get a new case. Stupid!!!!! Make the case fit the SYSTEM!!! ARGGGG. But really - that's not a bad gripe, the Locasters are pretty fantastic. They have completely replaced my arri 300's for "2-people sitting at a table" scenes...and saved me about $1000 on stands - you don't need mini-max menace arms when you can get away with cheap combo boom stands and still get the light boomed out about 60" from the stand.
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#12 Shelly Johnson ASC

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 12:17 AM

The few times I have been around LED's, the green spike or blue leaning color issues were unacceptable. Two weeks ago I was on a doc/interview shoot that was using some (from China probably) and the skin tones on the RED's monitor were very green.

Has Litepanels or anyone else managed to get this under control in your experience?


Hi Vincent,

The Mole-LEDs are color corrected with no green/magenta spike. There is a 3200 and 5600 version that are mixable with tungsten and daylight. You will not get an accurate reading from your color temperature meter since LED's occupy areas of the color spectrum that our handheld meters were not designed to read... but Mole went to great lengths to test their LED so that the color and appearance is as you see it. I conducted the tests for Mole myself, and worked with the color scientists from Osram who created the phosphor cap for the LED. The color was evaluated on film and is a point perfect match for existing tungsten and daylight units.

Those are the only LEDs that I know of that give you what you see.

Thanks!

Shelly Johnson, ASC
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#13 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 01:36 AM

Wow, you never know who might share some advice here. Thank you for that.

Funny enough I was just looking at some Moles at the Studio Depot store beside their showroom.

Very nice work on Captain America! I still haven't got my hands on the August AC magazine (they stopped coming showing up)
but Im looking forward to reading about the multi-format shoot. If you did more coverage on it elsewhere, please let me know.
(did you use any LED's on it?)
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#14 Eli Goldstein

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 03:40 PM

Anyone use these new Arri LED fresnels? http://www.arri.com/...ries/index.html

Saw them at NAB this year. They are dimmable and come in 3 styles; daylight, tungsten, and color controllable and are spot and flood capable.
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#15 Guy Holt

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Posted 01 August 2011 - 04:15 PM

Anyone use these new Arri LED fresnels? http://www.arri.com/...ries/index.html

Saw them at NAB this year. They are dimmable and come in 3 styles; daylight, tungsten, and color controllable and are spot and flood capable.


As an Arri dealer, I have had the opportunity to play around with the prototype of the Arri L7 Fresnel. For more details, see my newsletter article on LEDs.

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental and Sales in Boston
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#16 Jaron Berman

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Posted 01 September 2011 - 11:05 PM

It's little known YET, but ETC has a new fixture, the Desire D40 which should do a pretty stellar job in any test, and more importantly in real life. They make about 10,000 different versions of the fixture (or more realistically 6 I think?) but I got the Lustre+ version - all their fixtures use the 7 color Selador engine - 40-some Luxeon Rebels (3w), MANY different operational modes including a color calibrated mode and a max-output mode. All their fixtures are supposed to be spot-on in calibrated mode, and that boast coming from ETC actually means something. I have been playing around with them in their various menu configurations - they offer local or DMX control, and it's slick because you can set the 100% white color of the fixture to any color temp between 2700 and 6500 so that if you decide to control the light in a color-mixing mode (to allow simulated party gel colors) - if you punch it to "white" it's not just all-on, it's a calibrated white. There's a "studio" mode on all the D40 series no matter which model you choose, which is color temp, brightness, and tint adjustable - and you can set the dimming curve to be LED instant, or have "gravity" like a tungsten fixture when dimmed. If it's not obvious, I'm pretty impressed by the buggers. They aren't light, super compact, or battery powered. But they have immense throw and beam shaping ability (using plastic lenses like a par but with smoother field). I haven't measured output yet but according to specs they should have roughly the same power as a 400HMI, perhaps slightly less. Certainly brighter than a 1K tungsten, and again - white on this unit uses 7 colors, on mine I believe its RGBAW, Indigo and Cyan.

I just got them a couple days ago and have been too busy to shoot or measure anything with them specifically, but for $1300-$1600/ea street price they are impressive fixtures. Now I just have to learn to pick my beam shaping lenses - you can't "cut" the beam with doors without some diffusion as you're cutting the outer ring of LEDs and thus shifting the color.... but I'm sure with some practice it shouldn't be too hard esp. because you can stack combinations of spread lenses and diffusion to really tweak the beam - oval, circular, linear, rectangular.
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#17 Hal Smith

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Posted 03 September 2011 - 08:24 AM

The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Science and Technology Council has done a lot
of research into solid state lighting. Their work hasn't been updated with the latest LED's but
the research they have done is educational.

They've published their videos and reports at:

S&T Solid State Lighting
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#18 Martin Hong

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Posted 09 September 2011 - 11:51 PM

As an Arri dealer, I have had the opportunity to play around with the prototype of the Arri L7 Fresnel. For more details, see my newsletter article on LEDs.

Guy Holt, Gaffer, ScreenLight & Grip, Lighting Rental and Sales in Boston


Then you should write a preview article about these products. I'm looking forward for the performance of these new LED Fresnel
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#19 taggerty

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 11:32 AM

Please forgive for this really silly question and i'm new here and to the industry..

If i am using only one light with a kicker,

Can i not simply colour balance the light in camera or shot a grey card & color checker before i shoot.

Does it matter if the CRI if off  or if the light has a peak green?

forgive me but this is mumbo jumbo to me and would seriously like someone to explain it to me.

 

Thanks

 


Edited by taggerty, 17 October 2013 - 11:33 AM.

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#20 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 17 October 2013 - 12:49 PM

To some extent, colour balancing will fix the problem.

 

However, if you happen to have a subject in your scene which reflects light of a wavelength in which the LED is very deficient, it will always look dark and unsaturated.

 

P


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Paralinx LLC

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

The Slider

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc