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Little time, no money left. Yet I need to color grade.


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#1 Matt Stevens

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:01 AM

Yes, this is not good. I have until Monday the 25th, no more money and just a 24" DELL 2405FPW monitor. The only available software to me is CS5 Production Premium.

I have three shorts films, two shot on DSLR and one Super 8mm with an HD scan by Lightpress.

The Super8 stuff looks really really good. I have played it on various HDTV's at this friend or that and really am pleased with what I see. It needs just some minor tweaks.

The DSLR footage... Oh Lord. What a mess. So inconsistent.

Given the complete lack of tools available to me, what should I do?

I know, I know, you don't ask a surgeon to operate with a butter knife. But it is what it is.

Any advice is welcome, other than, spend some money. Don't have any money left at all. None. Zero.

And the clock is ticking. ;)
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 19 July 2011 - 10:05 AM

You could color correct off of a normal monitor, but you'd really need to know how to read the scopes and have scopes avalible. I know there is some color correction out in After Effects, if you have it, and I'm sure premier pro has similar tools. Your best option would be to track down someone with Color on FCP7 and work in there for color corrections.
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#3 Phil Strahl

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 01:22 PM

You could color correct off of a normal monitor, but you'd really need to know how to read the scopes and have scopes avalible. I know there is some color correction out in After Effects, if you have it, and I'm sure premier pro has similar tools. Your best option would be to track down someone with Color on FCP7 and work in there for color corrections.


i totally agree: if you know your monitor well and always have a good look at premiere's (TERRIBLY SLOW AND COARSE) scopes, you should do alright. premiere offers the 3-Way-Color-Corrector filter, much like FinalCut and Avid but i find it incredibly tedious to use there, because the separation of highlights, midtones and shadows is always way too hard, so it's easy to spend too much time on it and still mess-up pretty bad.

final cut pro, especially with apple color, would be a better solution but migrating your project/s there and back is prone to errors and omissions and probably will cost you more time than you might save with apple color.

my suggestion would be working in premiere with effects such as color-balance, hue/saturation and RGB-levels, since these tools seem to be easier to control there when you're a photoshop-veteran. just don't forget about checking on the scopes.


i wish you good luck, success and a never-ending caffeine-supply!
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 25 July 2011 - 04:35 PM

I'll second the RGB Levels thing.

Premiere is not great at grading (I have it open for the purpose behind the very browser window into which I type; this counts as procrastination). There is no way to do area selectivity ("power windows") without cumbersome stacks on the timeline, although you do then get proper variable feathering, inside/outside grading, animated masks, etc.

You can use the keyers to do selectivity, too, especially if you treat the clip with the keyer as a matte source then you can use filters on it to refine the selection.

"Track Matte" is, eh, key. Eheheh. Did y'see what I did there. Eheh... heh... oh, why do I bother...

P
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