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What Camera shot this ? (Lindsey Lohan for V magazine)


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#1 Nathan Presley

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Posted 20 July 2011 - 02:37 PM

Can you anybody tell what camera shot this ? Red ? phantom ?

Looks like its at least 120fps in some shots

(you can watch the HD version on youtube)



thanks
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#2 Nathan Presley

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Posted 21 July 2011 - 10:31 PM

There gotta be a trained eye here somewhere. :)
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#3 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 01:48 AM

Curious why it matters which one? It's digital so the raw look will be pretty close across a few brands/models. Hard to tell much from an internet video but it's probably a red, Alexa or an F3 since the water didn't seem to have the lower-end sensor artifacts you find with DSLR's and the like.

Looks more like 60p was used a few times (but I'm no overcrank specialist) so that opens it up to a few cameras. The color grading is strong and well done; this is where a lot of the "look" is coming from, more so than what you'd find between cameras anyway.
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#4 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 22 July 2011 - 03:06 AM

It can usually be very easy to spot film over digital, or vice versa, but to pick out of a hat what camera was used is like asking what film stock was used, so much can be done to the image these days that can make it look far away from the acquisition. This makes it almost impossible to know what it was shot on, because most days specifically with digital, people no longer shoot for the final product, they shoot to have flexibility for the final product. The worrying thing is if a DI is taken away from the cinematographer (a lot of commercial products, even films etc.) the look can entirely change from the original intention. All that is sometimes left is the angles of light and hopefully the framing too.

But in order to replicate such a work as that, I would personally be looking at the lighting first and foremost because to me that's what seems to be the outstanding aspect, whatever colouring was done is also another beautifully added element.

If you want to know what it was shot on, lenses and all, try contacting Todd Heater who shot it. He has some very beautiful work as seen on his website, a very nice style.

Edited by Marcus Joseph, 22 July 2011 - 03:06 AM.

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#5 Brad Grimmett

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Posted 15 August 2011 - 08:48 PM

None of this looks to be over 60fps to me. It could be quite a few cameras.
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