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The look of anamorphic primes vs anamorphic zoom


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#1 Kelley Cross

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 05:35 PM

I thought I’d throw this thread out for discussion.

I’m about to start a production with my round front Lomo anamorphics (35, 50 and 75) with my Canon 7D along with film to be shot with my Kinor 35H (35mm Russian camera similar to Movicam). Lenses have all been collimated and serviced by Paul Duclos and function wonderfully. I also have a 25-250mm Lomo zoom that is remarkably crisp. Paul stuck it on the bench and focus was nice and sharp all the way through. I have a rear anamorphic attachment for this lens that will take some doing (and expense) to mount to the rear of the zoom. I’ve been told that this zoom with the rear attachment will not cut in nicely with the round front primes as I would ostensibly loose “the look” of barrel distortion and substantially less (and different) lens flares that the round front primes provide. Was wondering if anyone had experience or thoughts on this. I’d love to use the longer focal lengths from the zoom for close ups (150mm and up) and matching lens flares along with the soft look of the round fronts would be a plus. I know I could do some things in Shake or AE to emulate this, but would obviously prefer to do everything in camera.

Thanks,
Kelley Cross
www.julysun.com
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 06:23 PM

Yes, with rear-anamorphics, you don't get the horizontal flare nor the oval bokeh in the background lights. Not to mention, doesn't your rear-anamorphic zoom end up being an effective f/5.6 lens wide-open? That makes it hard to use at night.
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#3 Kelley Cross

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 07:31 PM

Exactly David -- 5.6 max. with the rear attachment. Sans the oblong bokeh and horizontal flares, I was hoping to cut in with the zoom footage and make it somewhat seamless. There won't be a lot shot with the zoom -- just a few long shots and close ups. I guess I'm going to go ahead and invest in setting this lens up.
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#4 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 26 July 2011 - 09:03 PM

Exactly David -- 5.6 max. with the rear attachment. Sans the oblong bokeh and horizontal flares, I was hoping to cut in with the zoom footage and make it somewhat seamless. There won't be a lot shot with the zoom -- just a few long shots and close ups. I guess I'm going to go ahead and invest in setting this lens up.


Well, big anamorphic movies do it all the time, cut in anamorphic zoom footage -- it's not a perfect match but it works as long as the anamorphic zoom isn't too soft. Works better in daylight outdoors where you can stop down.
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