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last minute help!


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#1 Gary Gregerson

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 12:00 AM

i'm going to shoot a short scene in my bedroom using Tri-X super 8. I'm going to be shooting 2 subjects, myself (light complexion, white guy) and 1 other person (medium complexion, black guy). trying to figure out what exposure I should go for, I've calculated between f4 and f5.6, does this sound about right? any other suggestions for lighting people with these 2 skin tones? thanks.
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#2 Gary Gregerson

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Posted 29 July 2011 - 09:32 PM

i'm going to shoot a short scene in my bedroom using Tri-X super 8. I'm going to be shooting 2 subjects, myself (light complexion, white guy) and 1 other person (medium complexion, black guy). trying to figure out what exposure I should go for, I've calculated at 160 asa i need to be between f4 and f5.6, does this sound about right? any other suggestions for lighting people with these 2 skin tones? thanks.


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#3 Gary Gregerson

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 01:45 AM

didn't mean to post this again, i thought i was editing to add "160 asa" to the post.

i do have a question about shooting outdoors in shadow with tri-x, at 200 asa do you think an fstop of 1.8 should be pushed in processing?

thanks again!
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#4 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 02:53 AM

How are you determining exposure? ASA 160 is plenty fast for most shooting outdoors and you can get an f8 with a light level of 500 footcandles, which should be
available most of the day on an average day. Check a chart such as this to see the relationship between aperture and footcandles exposure table

Don't worry too much. I shot tons of Super 8 and usually relied on the camera's meter anyway or with one camera just set aperture by eye. I'm not sure how accurate a Super 8 lens aperture marks really are anyway, if you're hoping to take a reading from your meter and get that exact stop with your Super 8 camera.

I wouldn't want to get involved with pushing Super 8 either but if you're shooting outdoors with Tri-X, you really should be all set for exposure while the sun is out.


Edit: Just noticed that you were asking about a stop of f1.8 In that case, you might have to ND a camera shooting outdoors with ASA 160, even in the shade. In Super 8 filmmaking, it's probably much easier to just stop down. If you have at least 25 footcandle (and you might have more even in the shade) you can shoot f1.8 and you'll be right on the money.
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#5 Nathan Blair

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 03:26 PM

You're also going to have a bit of exposure difference between black skin and white skin, fortunately he's medium complexion so that helps. Nonetheless, I recommend bringing some reflectors to add some rim-light and fill to your darker subject when needed.
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#6 Gary Gregerson

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Posted 30 July 2011 - 09:30 PM

How are you determining exposure? ASA 160 is plenty fast for most shooting outdoors and you can get an f8 with a light level of 500 footcandles, which should be
available most of the day on an average day. Check a chart such as this to see the relationship between aperture and footcandles exposure table

Don't worry too much. I shot tons of Super 8 and usually relied on the camera's meter anyway or with one camera just set aperture by eye. I'm not sure how accurate a Super 8 lens aperture marks really are anyway, if you're hoping to take a reading from your meter and get that exact stop with your Super 8 camera.

I wouldn't want to get involved with pushing Super 8 either but if you're shooting outdoors with Tri-X, you really should be all set for exposure while the sun is out.


Edit: Just noticed that you were asking about a stop of f1.8 In that case, you might have to ND a camera shooting outdoors with ASA 160, even in the shade. In Super 8 filmmaking, it's probably much easier to just stop down. If you have at least 25 footcandle (and you might have more even in the shade) you can shoot f1.8 and you'll be right on the money.



thanks for the help guys!
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Technodolly

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Rig Wheels Passport

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

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