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Why Kodachrome 40 Film cartridges are still very valuable.


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#1 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 03 August 2011 - 08:01 AM

There are so many questions regarding how compatible a super-8 film camera's auto exposure is with Super-8 film stocks. One way to figure out how compatible your super-8 camera is to put your super-8 camera on a tripod and point it at an object that has enough light to be easily viewed through the viewfinder.

Next, insert the kodachrome 40 cartridge and take an automatic exposure reading. You will probably have to slightly depress the trigger to get the auto exposure circuit to activate, but you do not have to run any film. If you are using natural daylight, use the sun filter position, if you are using artificial light, use the light bulb filter position (both are on most super-8 cameras.)

Next, swap out the kodachrome 40 cartridge with the film stock you actually plan on using, and once again slightly deactivate the trigger on the camera to activate the auto exposure function. If the f-stop reading remains identical, you probably have a problem since the other film stock will have a different ASA rating. I say Probably because you need to avoid auto readings that are completely wide open or completely closed.

So if you get a reading of f 2.8 with the Kodachrome cartridge, then insert an ektachrome 100D cartridge, the reading should be around two stops higher (5.6) if you are shooting in daylight, and approxmately 1 and 1/4 stops higher (between 4.0 and 5.6) if shooting with artificial light.

If anyone disagrees with my numbers I'm ok with that because I have not officially tried this but I may later today and update this post if my data is different. Or, try the test yourself with a camera you trust and tell us what YOU get.
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#2 Martin Baumgarten

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Posted 05 August 2011 - 12:32 AM

I have found it quite invaluable to keep all types of Super 8mm cartridges on hand for such testing of camera meters. One way to keep a cartridge is to just ask the lab to send it back to you, or one like it.

Just a short note here as a reminder on KODACHROME, that anyone still having good unused KMA40 or KM25 filmstock on hand....that it still can be used to make movies processed as Black & White Reversal or in B&W Sepia tone Reversal, or even as a B&W Negative.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

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