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What is the "PITCH" size of 16 mm film ?


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#1 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 16 August 2011 - 01:34 PM

Th pitch size of 35 mm film is 4.75mm. I want to know what is the Pitch size of a 16 mm film ?????
Kindly give me an answer if you know
Thanks in advance
CHEERS!!!
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#2 dan kessler

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Posted 16 August 2011 - 02:25 PM

16mm long pitch = .300 (print)

16mm short pitch = .2994 (camera neg)
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#3 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 16 August 2011 - 03:59 PM

If you need the metric pitch: 35mm long pitch is 4.750 mm, short pitch is 4.740 mm and 16mm long pitch is 7.620 mm, short pitch is 7.605 mm.
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#4 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 12:53 PM

Why is 35mm pitch is smaller than the pitch size of 16mm ????? can mathematical calculation behind it or any scientific reason ?
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#5 dan kessler

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Posted 17 August 2011 - 04:23 PM

Because a standard 35mm frame covers 4 perforations or pitches,
whereas a 16mm frame only has 1 perforation or pitch.

Deepak, you're firing off questions left and right.

There's a lot of reference material out there that you can
directly access for answers. Kodak is one good site, but there are
many others. Try that google thingy. I use it all the time.
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#6 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 10:01 AM

“Because a standard 35mm frame covers 4 perforations or pitches,
whereas a 16mm frame only has 1 perforation or pitch.”
Sorry i cant undersatnd this answer sir ?? can u explain it clearly ?
Bcos,in 16 mm there is 1r & 2r Film stocks . in 2r 16mm film the answer u gave is not applicable ??? do u mean 1r by saying [b][size="4"]"16MM Frame only has 1 perf"
Dats why i cant undersatnd.

“Deepak, you're firing off questions left and right.”

Sir, i also know there are stuff available in net. But i prefer it hearing from ppl in simple term thats why i relay on u ppl :)and, i get best answers here from genius technicians :)
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#7 dan kessler

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 01:10 PM

“Because a standard 35mm frame covers 4 perforations or pitches,
whereas a 16mm frame only has 1 perforation or pitch.”
Sorry i cant undersatnd this answer sir ?? can u explain it clearly ?
Bcos,in 16 mm there is 1r & 2r Film stocks . in 2r 16mm film the answer u gave is not applicable ??? do u mean 1r by saying [b][size="4"]"16MM Frame only has 1 perf"
Dats why i cant undersatnd.

“Deepak, you're firing off questions left and right.”

Sir, i also know there are stuff available in net. But i prefer it hearing from ppl in simple term thats why i relay on u ppl :)and, i get best answers here from genius technicians :)


Okay. You're correct in pointing out that 16mm can have one or two rows of perforations, but that doesn't
change what I said. 35mm always has two rows of perforations, one on either side of the frame.
I was referring to the height of the frames as measured in perforation distance or pitch. So, once again, a standard 35mm frame is four pitches high, i.e., 4 x .1866 = .7464 A 16mm frame is one pitch in height, i.e., .2994

As to the specific reason WHY these are the dimensions, one must do some reading, because it involves the long history
of motion picture film. In the case of 35mm film, its dimensions and pitch can be traced all the way back to
Thomas Edison and George Eastman. They established it very early and it has endured to the present time.
Many variations have come and gone over the years. Again, Kodak is one good place to start your research, since
they have played a central role in the history of film.
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#8 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 05:41 PM

Sir, i also know there are stuff available in net. But i prefer it hearing from ppl in simple term thats why i relay on u ppl :)and, i get best answers here from genius technicians :)


But we are hear to exchange information to further our work, not to be a quick reference for folks who have not made the effort to look things up. Use you Browser to go to http://www.kodak.com/go/motion and look under technical information, and products. There you will find the pitch of all the Motion Picture Film Kodak makes as well as some of the reasons why. the pitch is stated right on the can of any roll of film you can buy, read the "anatomy of a motion picture film can on the Kodak site.

Then if you still have questions, we will be happy to help. but we are not here to write essay answers for folks who have been asked to do assignments.
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#9 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 21 August 2011 - 08:57 PM

@Charles MacDonald
Sir,only because i read i came to know that there is something called pitch and 35mm pitch-4.75. Then i got confsed what 16mm pitch size would be. thats why posted here :)

BUT I ACCEPT WHAT U SAID I MUST DO EVEN MORE RESEARCH MYSELF :) Thanks for the thought sir ill follow :)
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#10 Chris Millar

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 12:54 AM

For the most part, its a free forum - so Deepak can ask (and answer) whatever questions he likes ...

But Deepak, it's good that you show an appreciation for many of the people here, but understand that these people can also reply whatever they want, and in choosing to accommodate you as they have done their patience will eventually wear thin.

So yeh, it's usually a good idea to come to the party with something other than a bag of chips... Posted Image

As for your query - have a look at some exposed and developed 35mm and 16mm cine film - it'll all become very clear

Edited by Chris Millar, 22 August 2011 - 12:55 AM.

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#11 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 22 August 2011 - 10:20 PM

These days when so much is done using computers, it is not surprising that folks never have actually SEEN real honest to goodness Motion picture film in any format. A crew really has only one person (The loader) who gets near the film stock. The dailies are projected from a digital scan. even the editor is probably working on a computer screen.

There are still some theatres who have film projectors. But unlike my experience in high school, no one sees a projector in the classroom. (My avitar for this forum is a Very old picture of me changing the Bulb in a RCA 16mm School projector back when I was in High School in the 1970's)

perhaps that makes the process seem more complicated than it really is.

Deepak, can you talk your way into talking to someone who works in a local theatre that uses film for projection? They may be able to show you some film. Sometimes "trailers" (advertisement for coming films) are discarded after they have served their purpose here in North America, If the same system is in place where you are, you may be able to obtain one and see the frames, the analog and the digital soundtracks, The distorted frames on a "scope" Picture, and yes the 4 perforations on a 35mm frame.
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#12 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 02:45 PM

@Charles MacDonald
Thanks for the idea sir! But in my place hardly there is any theatre where still film projection done. they all are using "U.F.O OR CUBE CINEMA"
ill keep searching anyhow :)
CHEEERS!!!
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#13 Mark Dunn

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Posted 27 August 2011 - 08:12 AM

Perhaps this will help.
35mm.jpg
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#14 deepak srinivasan

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 03:35 AM

@mark dunn
SIR, THANK YOU SO MUCH THIS REALLLY HELPED ME :)
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#15 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 04 September 2011 - 10:47 AM

@mark dunn
SIR, THANK YOU SO MUCH THIS REALLLY HELPED ME :)


Of course the Wikipedia articles on teh subject have some illustrations of what the film looks like.
the 16mm article
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/16mm_film
has a shoto f both sound and silent 16mm frames, the sound one shows the end leader of an old US navy training film, selected to avoid copyright limitations, and the silent one shows some of my Dogs in the back yard.

The 35mm article has a picture of a clip of a 35mm print with various soundtracks and an anamorphic (stretched) image. (not my photos)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/35mm

Both articles show other references to look up.
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