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16mm to HD transfer


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#1 Bob Hoste

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 03:30 PM

Hello,
I am looking into shooting series of shorts on a Bolex Rex-5, standard 16mm camera. I have shot this before and done transfers to SD using cinelab and have loved the outcome. The new project I am starting will need to be in HD. So my question to anyone on this forum is, Have you used this before? What were your results? and any suggestions on a good lab for doing this transfer.

thanks,
bob
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#2 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 04:48 PM

We can give you 16mm to 1080P on hard drive as either Pro-ResHQ or Avid DNxHD...... at Cinelab...

Looks great...

-Rob-
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#3 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 05:14 PM

Not to undermine Rob, whose shop does great work, but I've been recently using Scan your Film our of Chicago. Normally I ask for ProRes4:4:4:4 1080p, though Cinelab is also an awesome shop
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#4 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 24 August 2011 - 06:23 PM

What are you guys using for your HD scanning work now Rob?
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#5 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 10:22 AM

What editing platform are you using and will you be doing any compositing or effects work with it?

The first HD transfers I did would be to HDCAM but now that tapes are going away and don't make much sense for non-broadcast folks anyway your easiest workflow is to external hard drive. If you are editing on a Mac pickup a FireWire 800 drive to keep your file transfer times down.

Generally speaking there won't be a difference in price between codecs so you can either get the highest quality (uncompressed) format or go for the smaller but still excellent quality ProRes HQ. If you are editing in a different format then you can transcode but you'll still have that high quality original transfer data.

If you shot full frame 16mm vs. Super 16mm, another thing to think about is if you want 1920x1080 HD and chop off the top and bottom or if you want FULL FRAME 2K (2048×1556) allowing you to do the pan & scan yourself. 2K is more expensive but gives you more control after scanning. Of course you can do a supervised session and make those decisions yourself at time of transfer.

Other than that, just make sure you use a good colorist that can make your film look amazing. That makes all the difference in the world.
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#6 John Sprung

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Posted 25 August 2011 - 02:14 PM

We use ProRes HQ and DNx175X. DPX is only used for effects work, it's just too bulky to be practical for dailies, and it doesn't have sound. For long term reliability, everything is backed up on LTO's. Don't trust those hard drives....




-- J.S.
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#7 John Michael Trojan

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:33 AM

Also feel free to give us a shout here in Philadelphia. We can discuss specific project parameters to best suite your workflow, but have full service capability with a Spirit2 plus davinci as well as flat scans to DPX or SR (if there is stock available!!). With experience and resources in a wide gamut of work from TV to commercial to feature DI we can get rather specific with workflow and support.

best,

John-Michael Trojan
Manager of Technical Services
ShootersINC
215.861.0100
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#8 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 26 August 2011 - 09:43 AM

I can personally vouch for Shooters, one of my fav transfer houses; though I haven't been there in awhile.
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#9 John Michael Trojan

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:37 AM

I can personally vouch for Shooters...



Thanks so much for the kind words. We appreciate them!

best,

John-Michael Trojan
Manager of Technical Services
ShootersINC/DIVE
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#10 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 29 August 2011 - 09:43 AM

My Pleasure John. Remind me to shoot you a message one of these days to talk about that DI Suite.
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#11 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 31 August 2011 - 07:25 PM

I had my 16mm 7231 negative transferred to HD (1080p) with stunning results. I used DuArt in NYC and when I told them that their initial quote was too much, they worked with me.

Highly recommended.
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#12 Justin Cary

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Posted 20 September 2011 - 02:01 PM

I would also recommend ScanYourFilm for HD or 2K transfers. They do an amazing job. I should mention that Rob @ Cinelab is very very good as well.

Justin
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#13 Will Montgomery

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 09:10 AM

The advertisers on this board are all extremely talented. I've used Cinelicious in LA many times and Lightpress in Seattle as well. Going rate on HD seems to be around $300 per hour (machine time, not running time) unsupervised, might be hard to get much lower than that on a Spirit, Shadow or Millennium. Remember with that price you are not only getting the top machines but some great colorists as well.
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#14 Justin Schroepfer

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 10:06 AM

I've been trying to contact anyone at 'ScanYourFilm.com' since the end of July, but I still haven't gotten any response. I've emailed multiple times and called them on numerous occasions to no avail.

I'm looking to HD san 200' of 16mm for cheap and that seemed like the best option, but now I must look somewhere else. Any recommendations for really small projects for fairly cheap price?
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#15 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 September 2011 - 03:14 PM

I've been trying to contact anyone at 'ScanYourFilm.com' since the end of July, but I still haven't gotten any response. I've emailed multiple times and called them on numerous occasions to no avail.

I'm looking to HD san 200' of 16mm for cheap and that seemed like the best option, but now I must look somewhere else. Any recommendations for really small projects for fairly cheap price?


http://www.cinelab.com
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#16 Bob Hoste

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 05:48 PM

Thanks for your response Will.

So if i am looking to have the footage in a 16:9 format. When I shoot, I should generally leave it kinda wide so the top and bottom won't be effected that much during the blowup/crop process?



What editing platform are you using and will you be doing any compositing or effects work with it?

The first HD transfers I did would be to HDCAM but now that tapes are going away and don't make much sense for non-broadcast folks anyway your easiest workflow is to external hard drive. If you are editing on a Mac pickup a FireWire 800 drive to keep your file transfer times down.

Generally speaking there won't be a difference in price between codecs so you can either get the highest quality (uncompressed) format or go for the smaller but still excellent quality ProRes HQ. If you are editing in a different format then you can transcode but you'll still have that high quality original transfer data.

If you shot full frame 16mm vs. Super 16mm, another thing to think about is if you want 1920x1080 HD and chop off the top and bottom or if you want FULL FRAME 2K (2048×1556) allowing you to do the pan & scan yourself. 2K is more expensive but gives you more control after scanning. Of course you can do a supervised session and make those decisions yourself at time of transfer.

Other than that, just make sure you use a good colorist that can make your film look amazing. That makes all the difference in the world.


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#17 Matej Pok

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Posted 23 November 2011 - 05:36 PM

Hi guys, I want to share my experiences of such work as we do it in central Europe.
I use services of Barrandov studios, Prague, Czech Republic.

Last time I had 15 min. of Super16, we scanned using Spirit machine. I had good colorist at disposal and could grade every (!) shot.
I got stock scanned to HDCAM SR 4:4:4, then saved as Apple ProRes 4:4:4:4 1080p files. HDCAM version is just for backup, I´ve used ProRes in cut.

And for all this I´ve paid €115 (that´s about $155), without tape.
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FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Rig Wheels Passport

CineLab

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

CineTape

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Abel Cine

Visual Products

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Tai Audio

Opal

Technodolly

Ritter Battery