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Warm in camera or in post?


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#1 Evan Burns

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 09:07 AM

Hello,

I have a question regarding offsetting color balance in order to warm up an interior scene with lots of window lighting. The camera we are using is a JVC HD110u. We will be using CTO gels on the windows with a few tungsten fresnels indoors. Would it be better to white balance close to 3800k to warm the shot up or should we shoot it closer to 3200k and just warm it up in post? My primary concern is the clipping of highlights in the red channel.

My instructors seem to favor shooting the scene as close to the final image as possible. However, I know people like to shoot closer to neutral and grade accordingly in post.
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#2 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 10 September 2011 - 09:48 AM

Hello,

I have a question regarding offsetting color balance in order to warm up an interior scene with lots of window lighting. The camera we are using is a JVC HD110u. We will be using CTO gels on the windows with a few tungsten fresnels indoors. Would it be better to white balance close to 3800k to warm the shot up or should we shoot it closer to 3200k and just warm it up in post? My primary concern is the clipping of highlights in the red channel.

My instructors seem to favor shooting the scene as close to the final image as possible. However, I know people like to shoot closer to neutral and grade accordingly in post.


Two separate issues -- if you want your interior and exterior lights to match each other, they have to be at the same color temp, doesn't matter if you blue-up the tungstens to 5600K or warm-up the daylight to 3200K to match. Otherwise you will have a difference between the two no matter what.

Now once everything is at the same color temperature, if you want an overall bias towards the warm, there is no right or wrong way. If the sensor is naturally daylight-balanced and you want to get the warm look based on a 5600K base, then you'd probably gel the windows with 1/2 orange and the tungsten lights with 1/2 blue, and leave the camera set to 5600K if you really want to be that picky about not shifting the RGB levels of the camera or the recording later in post. Sort of depends on what makes the camera happiest in terms of noise.

Simpler might be to get everything on set to 3200K and then set the camera to something higher like 4300K, halfway towards daylight. Or set the camera to 5600K, everything in the scene is 3200K, and then use a half-blue correction filter on the camera to correct out half the orange.
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#3 Evan Burns

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Posted 13 September 2011 - 11:54 AM

Two separate issues -- if you want your interior and exterior lights to match each other, they have to be at the same color temp, doesn't matter if you blue-up the tungstens to 5600K or warm-up the daylight to 3200K to match. Otherwise you will have a difference between the two no matter what.

Now once everything is at the same color temperature, if you want an overall bias towards the warm, there is no right or wrong way. If the sensor is naturally daylight-balanced and you want to get the warm look based on a 5600K base, then you'd probably gel the windows with 1/2 orange and the tungsten lights with 1/2 blue, and leave the camera set to 5600K if you really want to be that picky about not shifting the RGB levels of the camera or the recording later in post. Sort of depends on what makes the camera happiest in terms of noise.

Simpler might be to get everything on set to 3200K and then set the camera to something higher like 4300K, halfway towards daylight. Or set the camera to 5600K, everything in the scene is 3200K, and then use a half-blue correction filter on the camera to correct out half the orange.


Awesome, thanks for the help David. I'll be excited to give this a try.
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Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

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