Jump to content


Photo

Road To Predition - Lexington Hotel Room 1432 making off


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 rmpfilms

rmpfilms

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 19 September 2011 - 01:32 AM

Hello,
i was searching the making of the Lexington Hotel Room 1432 scene from the movie Road To Predition. can anyone tell me how Sir Conrad Hall might have done the shooting of the whole Lexington Hotel Room 1432 sequence. how he might have rig the camera and how the whole camera movement was done in the Lexington Hotel Room 1432 scene. it will be very helpful if someone can give the links of video showing how it was done.

please find the link below which is of the scene [Lexington Hotel Room 1432] which i am talking about:


regards
Partha Borgohain
  • 0

#2 Michael Tsimperopoulos SOC

Michael Tsimperopoulos SOC

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Steadicam Operator

Posted 19 September 2011 - 09:48 AM

It is a masterfully executed steadicam shot by Scott Sakamoto, who was riding a crane and stepped off, as Tom Hanks turned to his left to enter the room. It was a set, and as the crane was high up, there was no ceiling. As the crane was dollied and kept coming lower and lower, you can see how tight the headroom in on Hanks, as the ceiling pieces were rushed back into position. A pan is always the best moment to conceal a crane step-off and Sakamoto's execution is flawless. The shot was done on a 21mm Primo.
  • 0

#3 rmpfilms

rmpfilms

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 6 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 21 September 2011 - 12:34 AM

@ Michael Tsimperopoulos SOC , Respected Sir, Thank you for the insight, it is really amazing to know, how of this masterfully shot was executed.

Thanking You for your time and interest

Partha Borgohain
  • 0

#4 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 September 2011 - 07:25 AM

Why are we even talking about this? It's not the kind of shot that 95% of us are ever going to be involved in executing, after all. It probably cost $25,000 just to do that one setup!
  • 0

#5 Peter Milanov

Peter Milanov
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 38 posts
  • Steadicam Operator
  • Stockholm, Sweden

Posted 21 September 2011 - 09:32 AM

Phil, with that attitude you will never be a part of that 5%. ;)

Besides, you can always take ideas and techniques from very complicated setups and use them scaled down on smaller things.
  • 0

#6 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 21 September 2011 - 10:00 AM

I know I won't, that being the crux of the matter...
  • 0

#7 Jerry Murrel

Jerry Murrel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Little Rock, AR

Posted 19 November 2011 - 09:02 PM

It is a masterfully executed steadicam shot by Scott Sakamoto, who was riding a crane and stepped off, as Tom Hanks turned to his left to enter the room. It was a set, and as the crane was high up, there was no ceiling. As the crane was dollied and kept coming lower and lower, you can see how tight the headroom in on Hanks, as the ceiling pieces were rushed back into position. A pan is always the best moment to conceal a crane step-off and Sakamoto's execution is flawless. The shot was done on a 21mm Primo.



Excellent information, Michael. It's posts like this one that make
Cinematography.com worth reading.

Never realized a pan was useful for concealing a crane step-off.
Scott Sakamoto is indeed a great Steadicam operator.

-Jerry Murrel
CineVision AR
Little Rock
  • 0

#8 Justin Carrig

Justin Carrig

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 7 posts
  • Other

Posted 14 December 2011 - 04:24 AM

Why are we even talking about this? It's not the kind of shot that 95% of us are ever going to be involved in executing, after all. It probably cost $25,000 just to do that one setup!


Haha wow. That's like saying "I may as well never look up at the stars again, because I'm never going to fly amongst them."

Let's take no interest in anything that is beautiful if we can't create it ourselves?
  • 0

#9 Luke Lenoir

Luke Lenoir
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 36 posts
  • Director

Posted 15 December 2011 - 10:53 AM

Looks like they flew the ceiling out for the dolly/jib on Hanks.

The camera work in this sequence is interesting but I believe it is overcomplicated for what is happening in the scene. It could be simplified quite a bit and have more of an impact than it currently does (for me). Just my 2 cents.
  • 0

#10 Paul Bartok

Paul Bartok
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 223 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 15 December 2011 - 11:30 AM

Respectfully i have to agree, why bother if its so hard, is the wrong attitude, we would all be shooting soaps then yuk
  • 0

#11 Dole Ames

Dole Ames

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • Other

Posted 19 December 2011 - 10:39 AM

Why are we even talking about this? It's not the kind of shot that 95% of us are ever going to be involved in executing, after all. It probably cost $25,000 just to do that one setup!

Cynical douche.
  • 0

#12 Darrell Ayer

Darrell Ayer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York

Posted 19 December 2011 - 02:54 PM

Phil,
If you're not interested in the scene or how it was made why did you click into the thread to begin with? There's no reason you need to bash the technique. One day this could be relevant to anyone reading it. Also,Dole, there's no real reason for name calling... this isn't DVXUser.

Michael Tsimperopoulos SOC, that explantion is why I love this forum as well.

Regards,
Darrell Ayer
  • 0

#13 Darrell Ayer

Darrell Ayer
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 99 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • New York

Posted 21 December 2011 - 02:54 PM

http://www.icgmagazi...s/#comment-1295

“For me, it was doing an overhead Steadicam shot on a moving crane in Road to Perdition,” says Scott Sakamoto, SOC. “Dollying backward, looking straight down and then jibbing down to ground level, stepping off and walking into a room locking onto a mirror reflection. All this done, with the set wall and ceiling dropping into place, coordinating the dolly move with the grips, and the actor (Tom Hanks) for hitting mark and swinging the mirrored door in the precise position.”

This could help too...
  • 0

#14 Marcus Joseph

Marcus Joseph
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 404 posts
  • Other
  • Sydney, Australia

Posted 25 December 2011 - 08:47 AM

http://www.icgmagazine.com/wordpress/2008/07/18/stead-as-she-goes/#comment-1295

“For me, it was doing an overhead Steadicam shot on a moving crane in Road to Perdition,” says Scott Sakamoto, SOC. “Dollying backward, looking straight down and then jibbing down to ground level, stepping off and walking into a room locking onto a mirror reflection. All this done, with the set wall and ceiling dropping into place, coordinating the dolly move with the grips, and the actor (Tom Hanks) for hitting mark and swinging the mirrored door in the precise position.”

This could help too...

I was so amazed at how Tom pulled that mirror off so wonderfully, that to me is one of the signs of a fantastic actor. If that team nailed the shot in a few takes (no idea if they did or didn't, could have even been the first) I'd find that extremely impressive. From memory this film's crew was working extremely long hours, that entire film being the masterpiece that it is, is nothing short of what would be a hardworking and brilliantly talented crew and this shot just sums it up.
  • 0


Glidecam

FJS International, LLC

Ritter Battery

Aerial Filmworks

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineLab

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

Technodolly

Wooden Camera

Broadcast Solutions Inc

The Slider

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Abel Cine

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Opal

Willys Widgets

Abel Cine

Paralinx LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

The Slider

Glidecam

Visual Products

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Opal

CineLab

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Rig Wheels Passport

Ritter Battery

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera