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Loading film with infrared light ?


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#1 Philippe Lignieres

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 12:51 PM

Hi everybody,
Just as said in the tittle, i was wondering if loading 50' B&H magazines under infrared camera is possible without causing damage to the film ?
B&H magazines are very special and very difficult to load it without looking just a bit...
I poligise for my poor english.
Philippe
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#2 John Salim

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Posted 23 September 2011 - 06:19 PM

Absolutely no problem using infra-red monitoring Philippe.

You can use it with any speed panchromatic B&W or colour film...... but not with infra-red film of course !

John S :)
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#3 Brian Pritchard

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 03:48 AM

You do need to be a bit careful in case the IR lamps are giving off any visible light. You could test a short length of a fast B/W stills neg by leaving it under the lamp for a few minutes with a coin placed over the middle of the film and then developing it to see if there is an image of the coin. This is the standard way to test a safelamp in a photographic darkroom.
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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 05:07 AM

I'd have thought the issue would be light from the video monitor. What's the plan, do it inside a changing bag with a cable run to the outside world?

Most IR illuminators will be LEDs which very definitely can emit some very deep visible red light.

P
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#5 John Salim

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 05:51 AM

I'd have thought the issue would be light from the video monitor. What's the plan, do it inside a changing bag with a cable run to the outside world?

Most IR illuminators will be LEDs which very definitely can emit some very deep visible red light.

P


Probably a bit difficult to set up an IR camera inside a changing bag, but you could adapt a 'dark box' ( as used by high street minilabs ), or make one large enough to take a camera or magazine ( you could even use a wireless CCTV camera nowadays ).

IR LED's are very suitable as IR illuminators as they have a narrow peak in the IR region, are quite bright and will never emit visible light.

Personally I use IR goggles in the darkroom :ph34r:

John S
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#6 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 08:28 AM

will never emit visible light.




This is definitely not true for all types of IR LED. I've seen infra-red emitters for things like auditorium sound systems (for people with hearing problems) in cinemas and theatres emit really quite a lot of very deep red visible light. So, this could be a dangerous assumption.


There are, I believe, near IR and deep IR types, and the choice is clear.


P
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#7 John Salim

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 09:36 AM



This is definitely not true for all types of IR LED. I've seen infra-red emitters for things like auditorium sound systems (for people with hearing problems) in cinemas and theatres emit really quite a lot of very deep red visible light. So, this could be a dangerous assumption.


There are, I believe, near IR and deep IR types, and the choice is clear.


P



As it happens I've seen cinema 'IR' emitters with a deep, dark red light too Phil, so maybe they use different types of LED's ( with a wider bandwidth ) for maximum coverage ?

'Proper' IR LED's start to radiate from 880nm peaking at around 940nm whereas most colour and B&W film will be sensitive up to around 700nm - 750nm.

John S
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#8 Jock Blakley

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 09:46 AM

One set-up I once saw used IR-pass filters from still photographic suppliers (may have been Hoya, but a few years have passed now) over the emitters... seemed to work fine.
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#9 John Salim

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 01:24 PM

One set-up I once saw used IR-pass filters from still photographic suppliers (may have been Hoya, but a few years have passed now) over the emitters... seemed to work fine.


Actually you can use several layers of unexposed and processed reversal film over a lamp to use as an IR light source.

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#10 Ron Varga

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Posted 24 September 2011 - 02:54 PM

Hi everybody,
Just as said in the tittle, i was wondering if loading 50' B&H magazines under infrared camera is possible without causing damage to the film ?
B&H magazines are very special and very difficult to load it without looking just a bit...
I poligise for my poor english.
Philippe


It's alway's best to put into practice loading a mag without using any special lighting equipment. Just practice it till you know it like your toothbrush. Also, you have to ask yourself; "What if I don't have any special light to aid me in loading the magazine?" You have to know your tools.

Edited by vargavision, 24 September 2011 - 02:55 PM.

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#11 Philippe Lignieres

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Posted 25 September 2011 - 02:57 PM

Thanks everybody for so many answers.
I will try ASAP.
Of course it is better to know how to load a magazine, BUT B&H 50' magazine are VERY special ones, very little and quite uncomfortable to load.
In fact, i have seen a big black charging box with a IR camera in it at a military base where missiles were filmed by high speed cameras. And, of course, somme problems of jamming, I suppose...
But I was wondering if it would be very special military camera, or standard.
So, I will buy a cheap IR led camera, and see what happen...
In case it's easy to do, B&H 50' magazine cameras could be a poor man Ikonoscop...!
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