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#1 Cristian Carceller

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 04:44 PM

Hey,

I have been shooting digital for a while but my goal right now is to shoot some super16. But as a beginner to shooting on a film format, I need some pointers on stock, loading, processing, exposing, and a light meter to get. Also on a camera to get. I am thinking of getting a k-3 or a bolex. any suggestions on which camera to purchase? So if anyone has suggstions on how to start shooting on film would be great!


Thanks in advance.

Cristian
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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 05:16 PM

Welcome.

My first 16mm camera was a K3 that I had modified to Super 16mm. I was lucky and had a good one. I've heard it's luck of the draw on that camera but at $250 or so it's hard to beat for a starter camera. Many other inexpensive cameras are not through the lens focusing; you have to estimate (or measure) the distance and hope for the best. Make sure you get the M42 mount version so you can use Pentax Super Takumar lenses which can be found inexpensively and look great.

Another 16mm camera worth looking at if you are starting out might be a Canon Scoopic MS. They are basically as simple as Super 8 cameras with built-in metering and electric motor with a great (but fixed) zoom lens. They are around $450-$650.

Bolexes are of great from what I hear but haven't shot one.

Arri S cameras are way down in price now and would be a real cinematographer's camera to start on. They are extremely hard to modify to Super 16 but can be rock steady, extremely well built cameras.
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#3 Kip Kubin

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 09:00 PM

Exposure and metering tip

You could get a meter and double check it with a DSLR but it's just quicker to have a meter.

I use a Gossen Luna Pro - $65 on EBAY...just a s accurite as the Sekonic I used to borrow from friend at a fraction of the price.

My solution was to buy a Nikon F3 35mm still camera and practice with that...ignoring the internal light meter...it will only take a few rolls to build your confidence and get to a place where you can meter and shoot with predictable results.

Also, it's an easy/cheep way to test stocks without a 100 to 400 ft commitment. Fuji, Kodak, cross processing pushing pulling etc.
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#4 Chris Burke

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Posted 29 September 2011 - 09:23 PM

Hey,

I have been shooting digital for a while but my goal right now is to shoot some super16. But as a beginner to shooting on a film format, I need some pointers on stock, loading, processing, exposing, and a light meter to get. Also on a camera to get. I am thinking of getting a k-3 or a bolex. any suggestions on which camera to purchase? So if anyone has suggstions on how to start shooting on film would be great!


Thanks in advance.

Cristian


First, congratulations on wanting to shoot S16, it is a great format which is tried and true. In terms of cameras, the K-3 is very basic and rugged. A great camera to use and learn on. A Bolex is a step up and also a great starter camera. There are better lenses available for the Bolex, so I would go with that if possible. Loading either takes some pratice but is very easy once you get the hang of it. Despite using daylight spools, I would load it in a changing bag or in a darkened room. If you shoot color negative, which you probably will, expose it a stop over. The film will look it's best. I would get a spot meter or a meter with a spot function. There are many, but you can get a used Pentax on line pretty cheap. The cost of stock, processing and transfer is getting cheaper all the time. I am about to go into production on a short format comedy pilot which will shoot on Super 16, why? The look and cost.
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#5 Philippe Lignieres

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 06:40 AM

Hi Cristian

K3 is a very nice reflex camera to start with no budget.
By far, the lower price you can find. With M42, you can fit easily a 8mm peleg, an incredible wide lens.
Meteor zoom is very good lens, and possible to focus at 1m with a diopter.
And a good 24 or 28mm is handy for focus very closely. I got mine 28mm Pentacon for 5€ in a flea market.
You can easily upgrade it to super16 just widenig the gate. Just forget widenig viewfinder. In this case, you have to use SLR lenses : a good set would be 8mm Peleng (F/3.5), 16mm Zenitar (f/2.8), 24mm Kiron (f/2) 35mm and 50mm Pentacon. And Pentax, of course, with more money. Many tele you can fit.
Anyway, you HAVE to get off loop formers, a very easy operation to do (video on NCS site and ond different youtube and others).
Have fun and don't forget Foma 100R, just great with the special yellow/green filter in all K3 set !
Have fun,
Philippe
(France)

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#6 Geoff Howell

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Posted 01 October 2011 - 09:39 AM

with regards to the K3, It's a great camera providing you get one of the good ones, in that it seems all K3's are not created equal.
I've had two of them; the first was brought from ebay in 'as new' condition from a dealer in the Ukraine, it was borderline unusable tearing perfs like a hot knife through butter.
The seconded one I had on extended loan from a friend who hadn't used it in years; this ran more or less perfectly with little or no hiccups.

I think if I were to buy another of these cameras I'd take time finding one that had been successfully used by it's previous owner rather than buying from a faceless dealer who has hundreds of these things in storage some place.
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