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Speed Dial Question


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#1 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 02:07 PM

Hello, just wondering if anybody has the same sort of thing going on with their bolex systems.

I got an earlier model rex-5 system. The speed dial is nice and tight but there might be a concern. The marker reaches a few millimeters short from the 12 f.ps. line. Just for further information, the speed dial ends above the six on the 64 f.p.s.

I should run a test with a timer to see where my actual fps markers are. It might be difficult getting it precise, I'm still deciding what the bets plan is to do so.

In the meanwhile is this an issue? Why is it almost a full centimeter off from the 12 fps and not the 64 fps as well.

Edited by Andrew Glenn Miller, 03 October 2011 - 02:10 PM.

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#2 Chris Millar

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 02:13 PM

If I recall the plate with the numbers on it can revolve independently of the knob - yours has just moved ...

You should still have the full range on the governor - but don't take the numbers as gospel (you shouldn't with an old camera anyway).

To fix, take it off and figure it out - I don't have one here to remind myself, but its not too hard if you have the right tools Posted Image
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#3 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 02:19 PM

I should really invest in a digital camera of some sort..

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I apologize.
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#4 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 02:21 PM

If I recall the plate with the numbers on it can revolve independently of the knob - yours has just moved ...

You should still have the full range on the governor - but don't take the numbers as gospel (you shouldn't with an old camera anyway).

To fix, take it off and figure it out - I don't have one here to remind myself, but its not too hard if you have the right tools Posted Image



Alrighty then, I see two screws that seem to attach the independent slate with the numbers. Maybe I should pass it along to a professional, not sure what will happen if I start unscrewing these.

Edited by Andrew Glenn Miller, 03 October 2011 - 02:25 PM.

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#5 Jean-Louis Seguin

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 03:42 PM

Hi Andrew,

On cameras that have some wear or that ran improperly lubricated for a certain length of time, the parts associated with the speed governor wear down a little increasing all the running speeds throughout the whole range. Without replacing any parts, it is possible to readjust the speeds by shifting the knob position. If you adjust the knob for a perfect 24fps let's say, the low and high limits will also shift and the selector knob may stop short or overshoot the 12 or 64 fps marks.

Cheers,
Jean-Louis
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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 03:50 PM

Alrighty then, I see two screws that seem to attach the independent slate with the numbers. Maybe I should pass it along to a professional, not sure what will happen if I start unscrewing these.


If you unscrew them, they will come off - then you can put them back on Posted Image

The trick is to find the correct placement for the witness dial, but without any testing gear and since its wrong already so you're not going to to make it any worse by eyeballing it - set the governor at the lowest speed, then set the witness dial at 12 ... Done.

The proper way maybe would be to get a tachometer on it then set 24fps as centre - even when doing that you'll notice that 64 and 12 are off - and it's a question of what do you line up with what anyway.

I say go for it yourself - it really is simple stuff.
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#7 Chris Millar

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 03:56 PM

yes

... what Jean-Louis is saying is if you make the assumption it was done intentionally then don't move it.


If you have a digital multimeter with a frequency setting you can appropriately fix a bit of wire on the 1:1 shaft, send a voltage through the camera body and pick up the frequency that the shaft is rotating kinda like a weed whacker - it tends to work even without the extra voltage, at least on my cheapo DMM.
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#8 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 03 October 2011 - 04:33 PM

Thanks for the information, I did a little basic math and timing to see what I came up with on the 24 fps interval.

10 second duration

245 = 10.208 sec
238 = 9.916

recrank

237 = 9.875 sec
231 = 9.625

recrank

237 = 9.875 sec
228 = 9.5

recrank

237 = 9.875 sec
228 = 9.5

20 second durations

458 = 19.083 sec
recrank
454 = 18.916 sec
recrank
460 = 19.166 sec


I know it's not precise, but it gives me an idea. My camera seems to hold pretty decent times via the crank up method, so the marker seems to be doing just fine where it is atm.
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