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My first Chemical Kit


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#1 Andreas Haglund

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 11:47 AM

With the purchase of a Krasnogorsk-3 and some old film stocks of ebay I have also decided to give 16mm home processing a go.

Naturally the first step will be B/W negative film, staring with two 100ft rolls of relatively fresh and correctly stored Fuji RP 72161,
followed by some new Kodak Double-X 7222. As soon as I can afford it, that is.

The only supplier, as far as I know, of photo chemicals is Sydney is Vanbar Imaging:
http://www.vanbar.co...tem2=B&W&brand=
and I would really appreciate chemical advise that matches their supply, not to keen on importing at the moment.

I have planned for D-76 as developer and Ilford Rapid Fixer / Tetenal Superflx as fix.
What I haven't been able understand is what the Replenish process is and if I would need the D-76R or not?

Jumping ahead in time I also have a few really old cartridges of 16mm film. They have not been stored correctly and I can't
say I have much hope for them, but would still like to try shooting, developing and see if anything comes out.
At the moment I have, in 100ft rolls:
one Eastman Tri-X Panchromatic Negative Safety Film 7233 (from the 50's I would say)
one Perutz Perkine-U27 Umkehrfilm Panchromatic (from 1960, ASA 400 written on the box, not certain it's negative though...)
and then two 50ft U-Magazines, god knows how I'll get the film out and on to 100ft rolls...
one Eastman Background-X Panchromatic Negative Safety Film (expired 1963)
one Eastman Double-X Negative Film 7222 (would say it expired around the beatles first hits aswell..)

If anyone has any tips on how to, with chemicals or processing tricks, get anything out from these rolls it would be really appreciated.

Also. At the moment the only tank I have is a Lomo 30ft one. I'm trying to figure out designs for something that could take at least a 100
and advice on this point would be really helpful as well :)
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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 02:48 PM

'Umkehr' means reversal.
Though of course you can just process it to neg.
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#3 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 06:12 PM

'Umkehr' means reversal.
Though of course you can just process it to neg.


Generaly...

Some B&W reversal film has a silver Anti-Halation layer which comes clear in the reversal bleach - but will get in the way of a negative. Best way to check is to process a few feet if blank film and see if it ends up transparent.
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 06:25 PM

The only supplier, as far as I know, of photo chemicals is Sydney is Vanbar Imaging:
I have planned for D-76 as developer and Ilford Rapid Fixer / Tetenal Superflx as fix.
What I haven't been able understand is what the Replenish process is and if I would need the D-76R or not?


You can use D-76 as a one shot developer or use it in a replenished system... When doing a few films on a non-regular basis, the one shot method is used more commonly. To use D76 replenished you are best to use the Official Replenisher, which is one of the products that Kodak has started to Phase out in North America, so you may have to scratch mix it.

Freestyle sales does make an equivalent in their "Legacy Pro" line but you would have to get it from California. (some Photo dealers like digital truth do carry the Legacy Pro chemicals.)

Jumping ahead in time I also have a few really old cartridges of 16mm film.
two 50ft U-Magazines,


If you mean the 50 footers that the old Kodak and Bell and Howell cameras took, you remove the tape and the two screews on teh front, The film is inside on a small core - just wind it by hand. You will proably find it is emulsion OUT.
Note that the film is JUST on the core, so you have to open the magazine in the dark.

If anyone has any tips on how to, with chemicals or processing tricks,


There is a fairly INACTIVE Group on Yahoo, that I keep trying to get some discussion going on.. ;)
http://movies.groups...ovieprocessing/
You (and anyone else interested) are invited to join.
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#5 K Borowski

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 07:33 PM

Charles: To my knowledge, FOMA is the only stock currently manufactured at present that will not form a negative (this includes, Fuji, ORWO/Fimotech, and Tasma, & Gigabit not just Kodak).


I'm not familiar with teh D-76 situation, but there probably are alternatives out there that are more readily obtained in a replenisher/starter configuration. I forget what I have a big 5 U.S. gal jug of, I think an old concentrate of a machine-optimized solution.

I'll have to check for sure, although one shot is probably better with anything critical in anything sub-1 U.S. Gal (3-4 liters). Another issue is the amoutn of surface area, agitation, oxidation. The rewind tanks are notoriously bad for replenishment due to these factors as per Martin Baumgarten's advice. Spiral tanks might be barely big enough to consider it, in the 100-foot (30m) varieties
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#6 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 14 October 2011 - 08:23 PM

Charles: To my knowledge, FOMA is the only stock currently manufactured at present that will not form a negative (this includes, Fuji, ORWO/Fimotech, and Tasma, & Gigabit not just Kodak).


Yes, the original poster had some very old German material so it is up in the air if they used the same trick of FOMA. they probably did not but a 3 foot test strip will conform.

I am not sure myself if they Replenisher may be available in the "large" (50 Litre) size, but That would be a challenge to mix up all at once to use in a LOMO tank.
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