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Developing My Own Negative


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#1 John King

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:04 AM

Hello All,

First of all let me start this off with the acknowledgement that there are perhaps a million reasons why I should NOT develop my own negative, but the fact of the matter is I have film that is already out of date (therefore it may not develop anyway) and I am basically forced into doing this (Least the film just sits in a freezer and rots!) But the fact is, I have decided to shoot my project without investors, and develop the film myself (as I cannot afford a lab) Again this is PURELY a desperate move as the film is out of date, and who knows worse comes to worse it will at least be a valuable learning experience.

So with all that said, I have Fuji film stock color negative (not Eterna) in 400 ft. rolls. Most of it is 500T (yeah I know so fast it wants to expose itself!) and some 64D and 250D I was wondering what the best chemistry for developing this stock would be. Back years ago I developed some 35mm Black and White, but this stock is COLOR and as I understand it, a LOT harder to handle. I can see already that there are a lot of posts on here that I will be reading up on and studying. But just for beginners starting out, please tell me what chemistry is best.

Thanks in advance!
God Bless!!!
John Mark King
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#2 Simon Wyss

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:47 AM

John, would you want to process in spiral reel?
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#3 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 01:37 PM

The problem with hand processing ECN is that you have to do backing removal first which is done with water and a scrubber. After that you will have to get some ECN kit chemistry maybe from your local lab.

-Rob-
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#4 K Borowski

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 02:14 PM

Hand rem-jet removal is NOT fun, easy, or consistent.


I'd recommend you save the hand processing for E-6 or B&W.
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#5 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 08:50 PM

If you snoop arround Kodaks site they will show you the exact formula to mix the ECN-2 Chemicals. Some of the items required may be hard to come by unless you have a buddy at a big lab who can get you a scoop out of the drum it comes in.

Messing arround, I have got "images" at times by using a c-41 style developer. In my crazy youth I was a disciple of a fellow named Dale Nevile. who had a way of mixing colour developer using measuring spoons. The pictures came out, but what do I know, I have restricted colour vision (red-Green differentiation deficency) which made trying to make prints a challenge. (when It is too magenta, but you think it is too Green your second print will always be a nasty surprise) His formula used CD-4 and I think I should have been using CD-3 or maybe the other way around. It has been many years.

Getting the rem-jet off is as nasty as everyone says. I was only playing with 36 exposure rolls so I could get away with the photo sponge and lots of water method.

Perhaps you can persuade a lab to give you a discount for develop only if you will let them run your film on a slack day...
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#6 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:22 PM

I have seen hand processed 35mm ECN which Cinelab provided the chemistry to the filmmaker. The film had allot of remaining rem-jet on it and was physically textured which is exactly what she was looking for. If you really wanted to do home ECN processing you could build a backing removal device which sat between a pair of rewinds in a darkroom, there would be some testing to be done but it could work.

-Rob-
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#7 Freya Black

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:08 AM

. If you really wanted to do home ECN processing you could build a backing removal device which sat between a pair of rewinds in a darkroom, there would be some testing to be done but it could work.

-Rob-


Wow Rob! Thats a really interesting idea! I like it! Do you have any ideas about what form the actual device might take tho?

love

Freya
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#8 Freya Black

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 06:19 AM

For colour processing C41 might be easiest to start with. ECN chemicals come in vast quantities that go off quickly allegedly, but then it depends how much you want to process!

C41 will give you different colours to ECN2 but you might like the effect!

Certainly I would suggest you have a play with trying c41 to start with, it's easier to get hold of and you can see how you feel about the whole home processing thing before maybe commiting to ECN2.

The remjet is the big problem so you can see how you feel about that. Personally the fact that you don't get it all off, or your film ends up a bit scratched seems okay to me. I mean people spend all that time rendering pretend scratches over their video these days, so some people clearly like it at some kind of level, and the real thing looks much nicer! (actually I think the pretend scratches look awful usually)

It's something you need to try and see how you feel about it. There are certainly people who would say it is a waste of time and the results will be horrible, and there are those OTOH who love the results.

BTW you mentioned 64d. Not sure how old your film is, or how it has been stored but the 64d might be okay. Slow film can keep for a loooong time.

love

Freya
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