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Thoughts on the Eclair NPR and CP 16R


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#1 David Owen James

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 05:22 PM

I'm looking to purchase a camera and a serviced Arri SR I or II seems to be out of my budget. What are your thoughts on the Eclair NPR and the CP 16R? I have been told the Eclair NPR is hard to find parts for, but will that be a concern if I buy one fully serviced?

Thank you
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#2 Tom Jensen

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 05:42 PM

Why?
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#3 David Owen James

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Posted 18 October 2011 - 11:48 PM

Why purchase?
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#4 John Sprung

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 12:45 PM

The NPR is of far more historic importance, and was far more widely used. The CP is more rugged and reliable. The NPR was hard to keep working even when they were new.




-- J.S.
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#5 Tom Jensen

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 01:41 PM

Why purchase?

Yes.
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#6 Herbie Pabst

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 04:56 PM

I have a late model NPR (English made circa 1980, U16). Serviced and converted by Bernie O.,it runs like a champ. But I'm not a hi volume shooter so I don't have the experience of running the camera everyday. But I'm very happy with it. Plus I got it at a great price.
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#7 Chris Burke

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 04:59 PM

get an aaton ltr 7 if you can.
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#8 David Owen James

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 10:47 PM

Why do you like the Aaton LTR 7?
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#9 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 10:53 PM

Aatons are newer than the NPRs, and a pleasure to put on your shoulder. As for mechanics, I can't speak to that, but Aatons, though I'm an Arri man myself, are damned nice cameras.
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#10 David Owen James

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Posted 19 October 2011 - 10:54 PM

I know the CP 16R doesn't have a registration pin, which is holding me back from purchasing this particular camera. Does anyone know if registration is a problem with this camera or does it work great without one?
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#11 John Sprung

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 05:52 PM

The CP16 is an Auricon movement, it's about as good as a non-pin movement can be. The NPR "bench type" registration pin didn't really work all that well, so they're about a wash. For significantly better registration, you have to go with Arri or Mitchell.





-- J.S.
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#12 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 06:55 PM

The CP16 is an Auricon movement, it's about as good as a non-pin movement can be.


Actually, I have been told it is technically a _COPY_ of an Auricon movement. Walter did not sell movements to Cinema Products, but they reverse engineered the design.
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#13 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 20 October 2011 - 08:06 PM

The CP16 is an Auricon movement, it's about as good as a non-pin movement can be. The NPR "bench type" registration pin didn't really work all that well, so they're about a wash. For significantly better registration, you have to go with Arri or Mitchell.
-- J.S.


Years ago I nearly bought a non reflex CP16. The gate had some tiny balls that sat in the film sprockets for regestration. I did a regestration test, shooting some parrallel lines, then rewinding the film, rotating the lines about 5 degrees and reshooting. The two sets of lines weren't stable together, so just intuitively, that was a fail. Good excuse not to buy the camera.

Gregg
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#14 John Sprung

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Posted 21 October 2011 - 01:23 PM

Indeed, you have to test the individual camera. These are all so old that condition trumps design.



-- J.S.
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Aerial Filmworks

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Visual Products

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Ritter Battery

Technodolly

Gamma Ray Digital Inc