Jump to content


Photo

Winter Coat/Jacket for Set Recommendations?


  • Please log in to reply
20 replies to this topic

#1 Suren Karapetyan

Suren Karapetyan

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Student

Posted 26 October 2011 - 02:34 PM

First post!

I'm in the market for a new jacket and considering how I am now doing more set work and soon will be in production as a cinematographer on two thesis films for my graduating year, I am in need of a good winter jacket/coat.

Those assistants and people in production in NYC know how brutal the weather can be, and shooting in the forests and big parks in the surrounding area is no fun either.

I couldn't seem to find anything on the forum with this topic and even google for that fact. I am looking for a thin coat, that will keep me warm on set, let's say 10-30 degree weather. One that will allow me to work and stay warm. I know it's tough to find "thin and warm" but was wondering what you guys use?

Also- any other winter related gear you guys recommend? From shoes to gloves and the like.

Thanks, stay warm!
  • 0

#2 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3067 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 27 October 2011 - 04:15 PM

I have a North Face Nuptse down jacket which is pretty warm. If it's wet as well as cold, I have another NF jacket which is waterproof, fleece lined and big enough to fit over the down jacket. If it's super cold, I have the NF McMurdo parka, which is very warm, and also waterproof. Don't forget to keep your head covered, and have warm boots on.

If you look around a British film set in the winter, you could be forgiven for thinking you'd wandered into a North Face shareholders meeting...
  • 0

#3 Phil Rhodes

Phil Rhodes
  • Sustaining Members
  • 11939 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 October 2011 - 04:28 PM

Never wear North Face. It is, or at least a couple of years ago was, the favourite brand of British intelligence operatives, mainly military or recently ex-military people who'd never actually had to pick out a set of civilian clothing in their lives and thus fell easily into exactly what all their friends were doing. There was a time when entering a bar anywhere around Chicksands was to be immediately surrounded by fit young men with very short hair, conspicuously wearing North Face as if it wasn't a uniform.

That said I'm looking for an RAF officer's greatcoat as they are quite literally great coats. Sadly very few RAF officers are as tall as me, and were even less so the last time the RAF actually issued officers with greatcoats. World War 2 Wehrmacht dispatch riders' coats were almost as good, but it seems that all Germans in the 1940s were about 5'3" so I run into a similar problem. And you'd look like a Nazi.

P
  • 0

#4 Adrian Sierkowski

Adrian Sierkowski
  • Sustaining Members
  • 7117 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles, Ca

Posted 27 October 2011 - 06:35 PM

I often use my old Army BDU Field Jacket. Lots of pockets, reletively warm, has my name on it, no one would steal it, and I don't care if it gets messed up. I like to do layers, so under I'll have a sweater or the like if it's very very cold out. North Faces are quite common on film sets, however. I will also say that I find a jacket less important than warm socks and boots! I can't tell you how much it sucks to be nice and toasty outside, with frozen feet.
  • 0

#5 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 27 October 2011 - 06:42 PM

The North Face is really the only choice. Good long johns, socks, boots, hat and gloves in addition. The chill really sets in when standing around or sitting on cold things. http://www.thenorthf...n_US/index.html
  • 0

#6 Francesco Bonomo

Francesco Bonomo
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 366 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • currently in Rome, Italy

Posted 27 October 2011 - 06:49 PM

If you look around a British film set in the winter, you could be forgiven for thinking you'd wandered into a North Face shareholders meeting...


That's so true!!! North Face has become the de facto uniform for film crews in the last few years. Even here in Italy it's pretty much the same thing, though it looks like Patagonia is another very popular brand.


(edit: just realized I'm wearing a patagonia hat and a patagonia jacket in my profile picture - and North Face shoes out of frame :lol: )
  • 0

#7 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 27 October 2011 - 08:50 PM

Yep,

Sleeveless puffer jackets and bundles of tape that never get touched pretty much spells out film-wanker round this neck of the woods...

Some of course do use that tape - but there is a swag of people who deem it necessary that they too have a clump of stickytapes jangling round their bits

Art dept. are immune for some reason - they're more into Birkenstocks, 3/4 pants and floral shirts
  • 0

#8 Brian Drysdale

Brian Drysdale
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 5070 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 28 October 2011 - 10:12 AM

Got the North Face and don't forget the leggings, otherwise the rain runs down quite nicely soaking your jeans/trousers. A fleece is also handy, you can take the top shell off and still be comfortable.
  • 0

#9 Patrick Kaplin

Patrick Kaplin
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 42 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Ottawa, Canada

Posted 28 October 2011 - 11:17 AM

I worked quite a bit in Ottawa where the winter temperatures would sometimes go to -30 C with the wind chill (-22 F). I've always worn snowboard gear on set, and while fairly expensive I find it works the best. A good pair of snow pants and jacket (15,000mm waterproof is important) and I've never been cold. Except when my feet got wet. Never underestimate how important it is to keep your feet dry. Getting your feet wet 4 hours into your 16 hour day is a mistake you only make once. Buy good boots and multiple pairs of wool socks, you'll probably want to change socks halfway through the day. Make sure your socks aren't too tight in your boots, otherwise you lose blood circulation and your feet get even colder.

Canada Goose is the go-to brand here for winter gear. They are extremely warm and rugged, the jacket will last you at least a decade of use. But they are really expensive. Still saving up for mine.
  • 0

#10 Tom Jensen

Tom Jensen
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1234 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Dallas, TX

Posted 28 October 2011 - 01:34 PM

Yes, pants are an absolute MUST. I forgot to mention that but it's one investment you won't regret.
  • 0

#11 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 28 October 2011 - 01:57 PM

yep, pants are a must even here in the subtropics Posted Image
  • 0

#12 John Waterman

John Waterman
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 49 posts
  • 1st Assistant Camera
  • Chicago

Posted 28 October 2011 - 07:23 PM

I like to wear an under armour shirt as a base layer under my normal clothes. The "Cold Gear" shirts are best, but my "Heat Gear" works fine too.
  • 0

#13 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3067 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 28 October 2011 - 08:03 PM

On the subject of boots, I highly recommend Hi-Tech Magnum boots. They are waterproof, and the Vibram sole really keeps the cold out!
  • 0

#14 Brian Dzyak

Brian Dzyak
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1517 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Encino, California USA

Posted 28 October 2011 - 10:49 PM

Patagonia is a great brand as well. Columbia also makes very good quality products at a reasonable price.
  • 0

#15 Patrick Lavalley

Patrick Lavalley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Portland, Oregon

Posted 30 October 2011 - 09:47 AM

I wear an Ibex Merino wool hoody in the winter under my Patagonia Nano-Puff jacket, or if it's really cold my Patagonia DAS parka. I prefer synthetic insulation here in the Northwest because it performs better if it gets damp. That being said, I also have a North Face down jacket that I wear when its cold and dry, because down really is the best insulator for those conditions.

Check out "feathered friends"- they make really nice down gear
http://www.featheredfriends.com/

The North Face, Mountain Hardware, and Patagonia all make good down gear too. Get a good down coat with an insulated hood and you'll thank yourself- just don't let your down get WET. Down is rendered ineffective if it gets wet.

Like others have said, you'll thank yourself for getting a good, warm pair of boots and a bunch of good wool socks. Check out the brand "Darn Tough" for wool socks. Boots are usually a personal thing, for extreme cold I wear a big set of Sorels, but they're cumbersome to walk around in much. I've also had good luck with my Salomon Quest boots under a set of Neos overshoes. Changing socks partway through the day will do wonders, because no matter what your feet will sweat a little, and your socks will get a little damp which will make your feet cold much quicker. Make sure you dry your boots out at the end of each day, because multiple days of wearing them for 12+ hours will eventually render them less effective.

A good set of raingear is a MUST. A lot of folks like North Face. Gore-Tex or eVent is great. If you're on a budget, REI's line of eVent gear works really well, and will save you a bit of money. For the best gear money can buy, Arc'Teryx is it. You could easily spend $1000 bucks on a full suit though....Personally, I always have a set of non-breathable rubber rain gear in my bag for if it's muddy, or just really really wet. In my experience, all waterproof breathables eventually fail.....
  • 0

#16 Jon Rosenbloom

Jon Rosenbloom
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 713 posts
  • Cinematographer

Posted 04 November 2011 - 12:46 AM

If you haven't done film work in the cold, you might be in for a shock at how cold you will get when you are waiting around. I've found that the layering approach that's usually recommended for outdoor activity doesn't really work for the movie biz. Either you're busy and warm, or you're idle and freezing. Or, you're working outside, and then you're working inside. I would recommend some medium weight base layer stuff that EMS or Patagonia sells, wool pants, wool sweater, and then insulated snow pants, and a big ass coat with 700 fill down, that you can remove when you start sweating. I also wear a deer-skin hat, full-on mountaineering mittens, and a shell over the down coat. If you're in NYC go down to Tents 'n' Trails; a store full of stuff that better than The North Face. If you want the lightest insulation, check out Western Mountaineering. Of course, if it's 35 and raining, you'll be miserable no matter what you're wearing.
  • 0

#17 Marque DeWinter

Marque DeWinter
  • Sustaining Members
  • 117 posts
  • Digital Image Technician
  • New York

Posted 05 November 2011 - 09:42 PM

I went with the standard for Grips, Electrics, and construction workers... Carhartt. North Face is nice, but doesn't last as long. I like the Neo overshoes because you can just throw them on over your sneakers or whatever. Just remember layers are the most important thing. For instance the other day on Blue Bloods it was like 30 degrees in the shade and 50 in the sun...as you walk around you were putting on and taking off layers.

~Marque

Want To Shoot On Scarlet?
http://igg.me/p/4882...?a=32535&i=shlk
  • 0

#18 Patrick Lavalley

Patrick Lavalley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 91 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera
  • Portland, Oregon

Posted 06 November 2011 - 12:30 PM

I carry my cold/wet weather gear in one of those North Face base camp duffels, and then I've got a smaller roll-top dry bag that I keep on the cart to stuff my extra layers into when I'm not using them. Keeping the insulating layers in a dry bag is nice so that they don't get soaked.
  • 0

#19 Chris McAlister

Chris McAlister

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 1 posts
  • Camera Operator
  • Chicago

Posted 20 November 2011 - 03:51 AM

carhartt.
  • 0

#20 Chris Flurry

Chris Flurry

    New

  • Basic Members
  • Pip
  • 5 posts
  • 2nd Assistant Camera

Posted 20 November 2011 - 03:24 PM

Personal preference for cold weather. Smart wool long johns, two mid layers, a heavy weight fleece then a shell. You'll need rain pants and a Water proof shell for sure. If it gets really cold I have a Canada Goose parka I keep on the truck. Always have a atleast a pair of waterproof boots at you disposal. In addition to a pair of boots I carry a pair of keen winter boots. Some people prefer Neo over shoues.
  • 0


Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Visual Products

Ritter Battery

Willys Widgets

Opal

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Technodolly

CineTape

Glidecam

Rig Wheels Passport

Abel Cine

Broadcast Solutions Inc

FJS International, LLC

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

Abel Cine

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Wooden Camera

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Glidecam

Willys Widgets

FJS International, LLC

The Slider

Opal

rebotnix Technologies

Ritter Battery

Tai Audio

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

CineLab

Visual Products