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Lomography introduces handcranked 35mm Lomokino Movie Camera with identical UltraPan8 aspect ratio of 2.8:1


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#1 Nicholas Kovats

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:11 AM

This is incredible in my humble opinion. Officially released just a
few hours ago.

1. Cheap as in $79 US cheap.
2. Undeniable mass appeal.
3. Handcranked!
4. 36 exposure 35mm film cassettes.
5. Shoots identical UltraPan8 aspect ratio = 2.8:1, i.e. 14mm x 8.5mm
frame area is created by utilizing a 35mm 2 perf pulldown resulting in
144 "UP8" frames" per 36 exposure 35mm film cassette!

Official Lomokino site -> http://microsites.lo...y.com/lomokino/, i.e

Film type : 35mm
Exposure area : 24mm x 8.5mm
Frames per. roll (36 exp.) : 144 frames
Frame rate : Approximately 3-5 frames per second
Taking Lens : 25mm
Angle of view : 54 degrees
Aperture : f/5.6, f/8, f/11 (Continuous aperture)
Shutter speed : 1/100
Film Advancing : Manual
Film Counting : Volume display
Focusing : (Normal) 1m~infinity, (Press button for) 0.6m close-up
View finding : Inverse-Galileo foldable viewfinder
Flash sync : x-sync (hot-shoe)
Tripod mount : Standard 1/4" tripod screw

Check out the sample footage -> The
implications are wonderful!

Cheers!

Nicholas
UltraPan8 ->
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#2 Geoff Howell

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:27 AM

That looks pretty ninja!!!!!

I wonder if you crank it super fast you can get up to more than 5fps
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#3 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:42 AM

It's a nice toy, but I can't see it being anything more than that. Transferring looks to be a bit of a pain in the rear.

Not that I don't want one. I just sent my wife the link and titled the email, 'Christmas hint.' B)

I'd love to take one to Saigon next year, set it up on a tripod and crank it slowly. Get those time lapse shots of an amazing city.
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#4 Geoff Howell

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 10:57 AM

It's a nice toy, but I can't see it being anything more than that. How does one get transfers?


you can buy a desktop 35mm film scanner for less than the price of a 100foot telecine!!!
These work with both neg and slide film!
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#5 Will Montgomery

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 02:37 PM

you can buy a desktop 35mm film scanner for less than the price of a 100foot telecine!!!
These work with both neg and slide film!

Yes, but have fun scanning each frame (144), saving it out as a jpeg then reassembling as a movie. Not hard, just time consuming. After Effects could do it ok.


Shoots identical UltraPan8 aspect ratio = 2.8:1, i.e. 14mm x 8.5mm

Except it's twice the size, right? It is simply 2-perf 35mm...

Too bad there's not a 100' roll version! That would be fun. Then maybe add a motor...hmmm.... sounds like we're getting into 2-perf Eyemo territory which is something I've always wanted.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 03:04 PM

Hell I'd buy one for $79 and find some use for it. It's less than a "oh that's cool" 4x4 filter impulse!
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#7 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 06:36 PM

The manual labor involved in scanning and then putting the pieces together would be too much for me. I have a Nikon R10 super8 and love shooting with it. Super8 is just the bomb, to me.

Still, this will give some great pleasure.
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#8 Freya Black

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 06:50 PM

The manual labor involved in scanning and then putting the pieces together would be too much for me. I have a Nikon R10 super8 and love shooting with it. Super8 is just the bomb, to me.

Still, this will give some great pleasure.


I suspect that people will write software to improve the workflow in time!
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#9 Geoff Howell

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Posted 03 November 2011 - 07:33 PM

I suspect that people will write software to improve the workflow in time!


It really isn't a big job in after effects and I believe there's also a Photoshop script for turning film strips in to separate frames!
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#10 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 04 November 2011 - 09:21 PM

It really isn't a big job in after effects and I believe there's also a Photoshop script for turning film strips in to separate frames!


Cool! Previously, I was viualising me manually cropping each and every frame. Now to scan a whole film strip, obviously, you'd need a flat bed scanner. It seems to be the general consensus that dedicated neg scanners give better quality results for 35mm negs / slides compared to flat bed scanners. Is there any truth to this? Is there actually such a thing as a flat bed scanner that would rival a negative scanner for quality output?
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#11 Matt Stevens

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Posted 05 November 2011 - 08:58 AM

A few months ago I sold my dedicated flat bed scanner, which could scan negatives and deliver stunning quality. Whoops. My bad. :blink:

But hey, we were going to move overseas and I couldn't take it with us. Of course, now the move is cancelled. Sold lot of poop I wish I hadn't.
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#12 Jock Blakley

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Posted 06 November 2011 - 07:59 AM

Why is this in the Super-8 forum anyway? The 24 x 8.5mm frame is closest to Techniscope's 22 x 9.47 mm - and either way it's 35mm.

Albeit with a frame rate that's useless for full motion and a hellish post-production workflow unless you've got plenty of time or some nice automation happening.

If you did happen to be blessed with an automatic-advance scanner though - either automatically advancing a ~230 mm strip or automatically advancing the entire uncut roll, either way IIRC some Canon and Nikon models did one or the other - you could hope that the Lomokino's registration was accurate and probably get more than decent results.

Which kind of leads me to hope that somebody will find a way to adapt the Lomokino's movement to a motor-driven 100-foot-load camera :P
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#13 Will Montgomery

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Posted 07 November 2011 - 11:08 AM

Which kind of leads me to hope that somebody will find a way to adapt the Lomokino's movement to a motor-driven 100-foot-load camera :P

That's why I just ordered two.
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#14 Will Montgomery

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 11:17 PM

Fun little toy. Finally got around to using it.


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#15 Nicholas Kovats

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Posted 01 January 2012 - 11:39 PM

Good job, Will. And definitely steadier and more consistently exposed than the average Lomokino film. I will unwrap mine sometime in the new year and give it a go.
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#16 Jurgen Lossau

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Posted 02 January 2012 - 05:15 PM

Hi Will,

indedd, good work. We made a test for schmalfilm magazine and did not get more than 2-3 pictures per second. And we had real problems with steadyness even on a tripod - this is because of the handcrank and the whole plastic construction. I am not sure how long such a crank will work...
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#17 Paul Bartok

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 03:59 AM

Ive been thinking about it all day just imagine sticking a bolex motor on the side of that, and putting a 200ft mag on it hahaha if only,
Lets just see if they release something even better next, that would be awesome.
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#18 Will Montgomery

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 10:23 AM

It's completely a toy; fun but not practical for real work. It's all plastic and you can't crank it fast enough...it won't let you even if you could rig a motor.

What we need is something like a reflex Eyemo that shoots 2-perf on 100 ft rolls. Spring driven or motorized; that would be very useful. Nikon or Canon lens mount would be nice too.
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#19 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 01:01 PM

Dream on, my friend. Dream on. :P

Of course, it is nice to dream. I dream of a new super8 camera.
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#20 Dom Jaeger

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Posted 03 January 2012 - 08:14 PM

What we need is something like a reflex Eyemo that shoots 2-perf on 100 ft rolls. Spring driven or motorized; that would be very useful. Nikon or Canon lens mount would be nice too.


How about a Techniscope Arri 2C? Reflex, 2-perf pull-down, motorised and about as far from plastic as you can get. B)

The rental house I work for has one sitting in a cupboard waiting for me to overhaul it, but the demand for rental film cameras in Australia is virtually non-existent these days, so it's well down the priority list unfortunately.

There are plenty of other cameras that have been converted to 2-perf since the original 60s Techniscope era (local camera engineer Bruce McNaughton has done a few), but a 2-perf 2C would probably be the most affordable, if ever one pops up for sale.

In the US I imagine you could rent older 2-perf cameras for peanuts these days.
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