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Filters with Bolex H16


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#1 Tim Halloran

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Posted 09 November 2011 - 01:28 PM

Experienced Bolex folks: If I want to try out some color filters (yellow to red) for B&W shooting with my H16, is it better to use the filter slot behind the lenses, or get a filter for the front?

I’ve only ever used color filters out front on my Canon 814XL-S and Nikon R10 and those were big and a bit pricey. For the Bolex, I have 10, 25, and 75mm Switars—not sure what the front thread diameter is on those but they are small. Might be cheap, but difficult to find, if they can be had at all. And there is that 49mm filter adapter that some people sell. This might make it more economical. I also have a Vario-Switar 86-OE that uses Series 8 drop-in filters which are no problem to get and relatively cheap.

But questions of money aside, and maybe the convenience of the filter slot, are there any advantages, or disadvantages, either way—filter behind the lens, or in front? Or does it matter at all?

Tim
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#2 Chris Elardo

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 12:24 AM

This can be looked at from a number of angles. For instance; if you're using tungsten film outdoors and you need an 80A filter, it's best to use the filter slot so it eliminates the need to have a filter for each lens. Also, I'm not sure if any of your lenses are presets or not, since these use different filter sizes compared to the older lenses. The 10mm Switar with preset levers uses a series 5.5 filter- very difficult to find now, whereas the older 10mm uses a series 5. The 75mm lens with presets uses series 6 drop-ins, which aren't too hard to get. Do you plan on using any ND filters? I like to use these in the filter slot because it enables me to pull the filter holder most of the way out so I can open the lens and focus. If you're using a heavy ND in front of the lens, it becomes a real pain because if it's too dark you have to drop the filter out of the lens, focus and then put it back in. Also, some filters, such as a star, fog, close-up, etc. are only available as drop in lens filters which forces you to go with a wratten gel for your yellow to red combinations. Just some things to consider...
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#3 Tim Halloran

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 03:32 PM

Hey Chris,

Thanks, all great tips to think about, especially the point about the ND filter. These are all practices I'm sure I'd pick up eventually but the ND thing is good common sense and something that I won't have to worry about.

Cheers.

Tim
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