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Super8Arena vs Super8CameraShop vs Cheap-super8camerashop


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#1 Matt Stevens

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 02:56 PM

These three websites sure do look alike.

You have...

http://super8arena.com

And then you have these two...

http://www.super8camera-shop.com
and
http://cheap-super8camera-shop.com

Those two look very similar. But they don't have the same stock. Or do not appear to. cheap-super8 camera-shop has no locational listing on their website. Super8camera-shop is located in Bad Oeynhausen Germany.

Super8area, L├╝denscheid, Germany.

Has anyone ever used any of the above? For my next Super8 purchase, I really do want a serviced camera with a warranty, just in case.
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#2 Mark Sperry

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Posted 10 November 2011 - 10:51 PM

I've used Super 8 arena for both my Nizo 481 Macro and my Nikon R8 and my experiences have been great. Perfect actually. I recommend them!
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#3 Andries Molenaar

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 03:39 PM

You mixed up the URLs a bit?

super8arena is the same man as
cheap-super8camera-shop
L├╝denscheid is in Dortmund area.
Both have the same telephonenumber and street address.

Apparently the owner is trying to get ahead in the Google results with a cheap-look facade-shop :)

Here you have some nice comments on
super8camera-shop

http://www.cinematog...showtopic=32762

In Germany consumer protection is quiet good adn they have to live up to that there. Commercial sellers must garantee their items and buyers have a right to return good.
Even on eBay. That is why private sellers on eBay make such a fuzz with their legal statements.

From across the Atlantic I would not buy from these sellers. And neither from nearby :)
There you get the advice to petrol your newly bought camera. Executing your rights is very difficult and the exchange rate is not favourable. And then all other expenses on shipping and red-tape.

Also both sellers, in my estimate, are merely listing fleamarkets finds and where ever they get these goods. eBay, photoshows, local classifieds etc. Germany is crammed with top-cameras. You can hope that things are tested a bit and that is it. Certainly no expenses are made on overhaul or clean and lubes.



But then, when you see at what price US shops purchase from EU and then need get some margin on that you can understand why cameras are so deerly priced in NYC

Just my two cents.

Edited by Andries Molenaar, 11 November 2011 - 03:43 PM.

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#4 Matt Stevens

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 08:27 PM

I feel like banging my head against a concrete wall as it seems only rich people can afford super8. :blink:

Looking at NYC, the prices being asked for cameras is insane. $850 for a Canon 814 XL-S, $1200 for the Canon 1014 XL-S! $750 for a Nikon R10. That's crackers. Maybe I can work out something with them for the Nikon. It's Christmas, so they could possibly me merry and giving, but they'd have to come down since it doesn't have the manual or original carrying case.

I had read good things about Super8arena and nothing negative. Their prices are high, but nothing compared to Duall in NYC. And they have some very nice looking cameras at the moment.

A near mint Canon 814 XL-S with the wide angle adapter is $677. Expensive, but that wide angle adapter isn't exactly easy to find and it is always $200+ on eBay.

They also have one at $473 and another at $500.

They have three 1014 XL-S' $582 and $636.

The Braun Nizo 6080 Professional with some very nice extras is $541. That seems reasonable. I have never even held a Nizo, but know how well regarded they are. And quiet. That would help at weddings. But I know Nikons and Canon's pretty well, so this is the great unknown.

They have a Canon 1014 Auto Zoom Electronic for $378 and while I kind of have my heart set on a nicer looking camera, this is known as a workhorse with almost all of the bells and whistles of the XL-S.

Guys, I am really conflicted. I don't want to purchase a camera that will disappoint me. I have already done that three times. One turned out wonderfully, but it is no longer mine. :(

I need a reliable replacement that will read all stocks available and allow me to have the ease of use features you find in the Nikon R10 and Canon 1014/814 XL-S'.

And no doubt I must buy a cameras as I dropped a couple hundred on stock/processing/scan during Pro8mm's Halloween sale.

By the way, I am willing to spend as high as $700, but for that price, it had best knock my socks off. It would be better if I could spend around $500 to $550.
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#5 Daniel Klockenkemper

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 10:51 PM

Matt,

I own a Nizo 6080, and have used some of the Canons. The Canon S8 cameras seem more production oriented, with manual controls that are very accessible.

The Nizo 6080 seems more geared toward documentary or ENG-type use. It's primarily designed for auto exposure, and the meter is very good in my experience. To do manual exposure, I get an auto exposure reading, then turn the exposure dial from "auto" to "fix". If I want to adjust the f-stop further, I can turn the dial to "man" and toggle between + and - while looking at the scale in the viewfinder. The exposure dial has a +1 button in the middle you can hold when you're on auto and point the camera at a backlit subject; there's also a +1 position on the dial to force the camera to overexpose by 1 stop constantly. So it's fussy but usable if you're trying to be in total control, but does a respectable job for run & gun shoots.

It's very well balanced despite being on the heavier side (I think the capstan for sound recording makes up for much of the weight). It has a fold-down shoulder stock to make it easier to shoot handheld for longer periods.

The cartridge area has 6 switches for compatibility with films notched from ISO 25D-400D, and from 40T-640T, so it's compatible with all currently-available films. There's also an exposure compensation dial next to the door for rating the film +/- 1 stop in 1/3-stop increments.

It does have a built-in intervalometer with 2, 5, and 15-second intervals, which is a very cool feature. It also has a nice 7-80 zoom lens with a great macro setting - I can focus mine on dust on the front of the lens if I go far enough. The viewfinder uses a beamsplitter instead of being true reflex, so you don't see the depth of field (which is usually pretty deep anyway). It siphons off a little bit of the light that would otherwise go to the film; combined with the 220-degree shutter, exposures end up being 1/43rd at 24fps and 1/32nd at 18fps. That doesn't make for the sharpest motion, and might be too slow for some people.

I have noticed some gate weave here and there. Though not bad at all, it doesn't have the incredibly steady registration that you'd find on the Nikons.

It's very quiet for a S8 camera. The noise of the camera running would be drowned out by a few people talking, but it's not perfectly silent if you're recording dialog for a narrative film. It's comparable with some of the earlier quiet 16mm cameras, like an Eclair or Arri 16SR.

The Nizo does have a reputation as being more delicate. Mine has survived flights overseas, inside its travel case, packed inside my oversize suitcase (which I checked, as it was much too big to carry on). I'm not pressing it into service nearly as often as you are, though, so I can't comment on its long-term durability. I also treat my equipment very well and never seem to have reliability problems with anything I own, so I'm probably not the most representative sample.

One thing to note - I did have some difficulties using Pro8mm reloaded stocks when I tried them. I did happen to order the thickest stock Pro8mm reloads, and I think the stocks were wound too tightly in order to cram 50 feet into the cartridge. I've never had a single problem with Kodak cartridges.

I hope that gives you a good impression of the Nizo. Personally, I like it a lot. It's a swiss army knife of a camera, and does a lot of things really, really well. It's the best if you need a quiet camera, but if some other feature is paramount, there are other good cameras to consider.

Regards,

Daniel
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#6 Matt Stevens

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 01:52 PM

I'm thinking I need a camera strictly for Straight8 shooting that I could take round the world. Compact, sturdy, reliable, with a footage counter detailed enough to keep track of what I was shooting. And an ability to read a 500t cartridge too. Overexposing by a bit would be fine, as negative stock loves to be overexposed.
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#7 Will Montgomery

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 10:26 AM

I've owned about 15 different Super 8 cameras and I can't say which is my favorite because each does something really good.

The overall best quality footage I've ever gotten is from a Beaulieu 4008 Jubilee edition with the 1.2 Angie lens. It's the black 4008 ZMII with the newer style Beaulieu logo. Amazing sharpness and steadiness, plus I love the manual options for everything. Problem with it is that it's not easy to carry around and keep in a bag/case. I've found a few bags that work but I'm always afraid I'm going to dent the lens (which I have on another 4008).

The most rugged and runner up on quality was probably a Canon 814 Autozoom. What a hunk of metal! Only downside is the weight and lack of speed higher than 32fps. If you can get a good deal on this one, Pro8mm can adjust the film speed reader to match today's stocks super accurately plus they can widen the gate if that appeals to you. Not cheap, something like $500 to do.

Easiest to use yet most problematic is probably the Canon AF-310xl. As long as it focuses on what you want it is fine; you have to keep stoping and pulling the trigger if your subject is moving for it to refocus. Notorious for being soft, mostly due to people not understanding how that original autofocus works.
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#8 Matt Stevens

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 12:12 PM

The most rugged and runner up on quality was probably a Canon 814 Autozoom. What a hunk of metal! Only downside is the weight and lack of speed higher than 32fps. If you can get a good deal on this one, Pro8mm can adjust the film speed reader to match today's stocks super accurately plus they can widen the gate if that appeals to you. Not cheap, something like $500 to do.

I thought the Autozoom does 12, 18 and 24??? They are on eBay constantly. Must be millions of them. I've always considered buying one and am currently thinking it might be the right choice as my next "Straight8" shooter. I need something small, reliable and not expensive.

Question is, how will it interpret the 200t and 500t Kodak negative cartridges? My next straight8 will certainly have to be shot 500t because of the low light situations I'll be in.
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#9 Will Montgomery

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 03:09 PM

I thought the Autozoom does 12, 18 and 24??? They are on eBay constantly. Must be millions of them. I've always considered buying one and am currently thinking it might be the right choice as my next "Straight8" shooter. I need something small, reliable and not expensive.

Question is, how will it interpret the 200t and 500t Kodak negative cartridges? My next straight8 will certainly have to be shot 500t because of the low light situations I'll be in.

That sounds right on camera speed, I haven't used it in three years; just remember wishing it could go faster. It does 200T just fine and 500t will just shoot at the max aperture anyway since you'll use it in low-light where it probably not be fast enough anyway. It might recognize it as 400t or so. Not an issue since you want it slightly over exposed anyway.

It is definitely reliable and not expensive but not sure about small... I'd say mid-sized and HEAVY.
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#10 Matt Stevens

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 04:26 PM

It is definitely reliable and not expensive but not sure about small... I'd say mid-sized and HEAVY.

I love heavy. :) Heavy is good. Yeah, it isn't small small, but it sure as heck isn't Canon 1014 or Nikon T10 big.

I'll push the 500t to its limits. Always seem to do so. Since I like grain, it works out just fine.
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#11 Claus Harding

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 04:57 PM

Since the Nizo 6080 got brought up, just a caution:

The main drive belt in it (and its smaller siblings) is a small rubber belt that, if and when it goes, is hell to try and replace. I lost my last Nizo sound camera that way.
Also, the 6080 was the last big sound camera made by Nizo when their finances were going under, so there are dark stories about poor quality control and such.
As a model it is a lovely camera, it's just a pity it came out just before "the fall."

That said, I have now had three Nizos since the 70es and I have always enjoyed their line, so one recommendation to add:
The Braun Nizo Professional, my current camera.

Nice and heavy, killer lens (one of the best made for Super-8) superb ergonomics and a unique automatic long-term exposure mode where you can set it up to catch the dawn in time-lapse, for instance. It runs at 25fps instead of 24, and if indeed it is right on-speed, it has made absolutely no difference to me when viewing it on a projector or in a transfer.

It is not as quiet as a sound camera and the ASA only goes to 160. I have shot Kodak Vision 250 with it indoors with great results.

Claus.
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