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final word on basic grip practices?


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#1 Josh Bass

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 02:21 AM

So, I thought I had all this stuff straight.

I'd always heard when setting up a c stand, you put the weight over the longest leg (example, 300w fresnel attached to c stand arm, that arm goes over the long leg), and then you bag the long leg if a bag is deemed necessary. Recently I heard the bag was no good if not touching the ground, and it'd be better to put it one of the lower "back" legs if doing so allowed the bag to touch the ground. I always thought the bag SHOULDN'T be touching the ground, because if it's resting on the ground, it's not really putting weight on the leg at all, it's just there.

What's right?
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#2 Karl Eklund

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 09:58 AM

I would say it depends on the bags, there are some that folds well over a C-stand and can't get accidentally pushed off it. There are other ones that really don't fold at all and then sort of just "balances" on the leg, in that case I would think it is better for it to be touching the ground a bit so I doesn't get kicked so it swings out of position. But ideally, I have the long/tall leg weighted down and in the opposite direction to what the force is/are, gravity, wind, etc...

Edited by Karl Eklund, 11 November 2011 - 10:02 AM.

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#3 John Sprung

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Posted 11 November 2011 - 02:19 PM

The long leg should be in the direction of the load. Wrap the bag around the column of the stand opposite the long leg. And set the stand on the side of the light away from camera unless there's no room.




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#4 robert duke

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 01:21 AM

you are correct josh. the big leg goes under the weight. As for bagging I prefer and was taught to bag the big leg so as the bag was not touching the ground, But I have run across people who were taught different.

some people Bag the medium leg away from the weight so it COUNTERS the weight, after all you are just lowering the center of gravity. the Grip book has a drawing with the leg opposing the weight. I even prefer to leave a cstand unbagged on stage unless the flag is well cantilevered over the leg. It all follows the KEY and the KEY is always right. Do it his way. Some people always wear tool belts, some people never wear more than a gerber.

as long as it is safe it is ok.
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#5 Josh Bass

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Posted 12 November 2011 - 02:26 AM

Thanks. The kind of shoots I grip on, there is no key. Tiny 2 or 3 man crew shoots is what I mean. I've just heard different things from different people. Just find it fascinating that there is not only different advice out there, but contradictory advice as well.
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#6 Patrick Kaplin

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 08:29 AM

For bagging c-stands with bags that don't have a seam dividing the bag into two sections, turn the bag on it's side so that the seam that runs the perimeter of the bag is in contact with the leg. You'll find the bag folds onto the leg much easier this way. Sorry if that didn't make too much sense, hard to describe clearly.
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#7 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 10:21 PM

So, I thought I had all this stuff straight.

I'd always heard when setting up a c stand, you put the weight over the longest leg (example, 300w fresnel attached to c stand arm, that arm goes over the long leg), and then you bag the long leg if a bag is deemed necessary. Recently I heard the bag was no good if not touching the ground, and it'd be better to put it one of the lower "back" legs if doing so allowed the bag to touch the ground. I always thought the bag SHOULDN'T be touching the ground, because if it's resting on the ground, it's not really putting weight on the leg at all, it's just there.

What's right?


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#8 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 19 November 2011 - 10:23 PM

A bag that is touching the ground is compromised, you are not using it to full effect. The stand should support the full weight of the bag.
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#9 David Ross

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Posted 12 December 2011 - 11:28 AM

totally agree with Darryl on this one.
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#10 Conor Stalvey

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 10:33 AM

I was always taught and still practice, that the tall leg should be underneath the load and the sandbag placed on that leg.
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#11 Tom Jensen

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 08:21 PM

Help me out, grips. Also the gobo arms need to go over the top of the tightening handle so the weight will automatically tighten the gobo in a clockwise direction. Does that make sense? A grip can explain that better than I.
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#12 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 14 August 2012 - 10:13 PM

Are you referring to right hand rule Tom? Where you face the locking wing-nut towards the right so gravity on the load tightens it.
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#13 Darryl Richard Humber

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Posted 18 August 2012 - 10:41 AM

Are you referring to right hand rule Tom? Where you face the locking wing-nut towards the right so gravity on the load tightens it.


As with everything else, "righty tighty lefty loosey." The knob should tighten as the load falls. Keep the knob on the right.
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#14 David M Aronson

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Posted 22 August 2012 - 12:58 PM

If you're hanging a heavy light out or a light with a softbox, I often hang a small bag on the other side as a counter weight. This brings the center of gravity back over the center of the stand and it makes it infinitely more stable. I keep a couple boa bags on hand at all times just for this.
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#15 John David Miller

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Posted 25 August 2012 - 12:31 AM

There really isn't a cookie cutter method to bagging a C-stand. I'm not a big fan of absolutes, for example "ALWAYS bag the tall leg." There are times when you can't or don't need to. If I had to come up with an absolute for you or a final word(s); "ALWAYS think about what you are doing." Don't look to the internet to find ways to be on auto-pilot at work. Pay attention to what you are doing with the sandbag and what you want to accomplish. If you do not have the common sense to keep a stand from tipping over, perhaps you should consider a job in front of the camera instead.

Don't be afraid to put more than one bag on a stand...
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#16 Walter Royle

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Posted 27 November 2012 - 11:51 AM

I like to put a bag on the big leg and a back leg. Whenever Im doing any kind of offset rig. Especially with a C stand. I have seen people walk in to a stand on set, so I always double bag.
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#17 George Ebersole

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Posted 18 December 2012 - 10:15 PM

There really isn't a cookie cutter method to bagging a C-stand. I'm not a big fan of absolutes, for example "ALWAYS bag the tall leg." There are times when you can't or don't need to. If I had to come up with an absolute for you or a final word(s); "ALWAYS think about what you are doing." Don't look to the internet to find ways to be on auto-pilot at work. Pay attention to what you are doing with the sandbag and what you want to accomplish. If you do not have the common sense to keep a stand from tipping over, perhaps you should consider a job in front of the camera instead.

Don't be afraid to put more than one bag on a stand...

When I gripped a lot I had lot of grips and gaffers always say the tall big leg rule, but others tended to throw bags on depending on the load. A bag touching the ground, to me, will eventually have its mass used as a counter weight if the load on the arm is heavy enough. Grips who worked like that tended to toss more bags on a stand which tended to look sloppy and unkempt, but it worked.

Using common sense is the best advice.
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