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Improved Muzzle Flashes


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#1 Alex Greene

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 11:01 AM

Here's my improved attempt at creating Muzzle Flashes on Sony Vegas Pro 10, any further feedback would be appreciated!



Thanks guys.

Edited by Alex Greene, 13 November 2011 - 11:02 AM.

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#2 dan kessler

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 02:06 PM

Maybe take the smoke density down a bit,
a little more noise in the transparency
to break up the uniformity; it's a little
too dark, keep it on the light side.

Less is more.


(just like real vfx dailies!)
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#3 David Gregg

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 08:29 PM

Your smoke is too gray (background bleed through) and the velocity feels wrong. If you are doing the smoke in After Effects (or similar) take the smoke you have on black and move the black and white to the alpha channel. You can then put a full field of turbulent whitish gray in the color channels and get rid of the dark ring on the edges completely.

First thing I would do is find all of the real and movie muzzle flashes I could and compile them into a reference reel to study. Then start building an image based on the real thing, and work toward the imaginary and dramatized version. Finding some real muzzle flashes at night from a similar kind of firearm would be a good thing to find as an element.


http://www.davidgreggassociates.com

Edited by David Gregg, 13 November 2011 - 08:31 PM.

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#4 Phil Rhodes

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Posted 13 November 2011 - 10:24 PM

What Mr. Gregg said. Too many people try to screen the smoke in; treat it instead as an alpha channel, and put some other, more solid smoke in as the colour.

Also the flashes are far too small.

Lastly, you're in a situation where the flashes would be barely visible, even with the magnesium-enhanced movie blanks. Do a night exterior and you'll get the big white flashes. Anywhere well lit or in daylight and it's a lambent effect at best.

P
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#5 John Sprung

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Posted 14 November 2011 - 02:39 PM

In reality, you'd barely see the smoke at all in daylight -- or pretty much any lighting condition. Maybe it would be something to bring in as a last subtle touch after you get the flame right. But at this point, it's way too heavy.



-- J.S.
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