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#1 Bowie Rascal

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 03:53 AM

hello guys, i don't know how many of u can understand my frustration. i already learn basic of lighting, i really want to know advance lighting. i want to light scene's like professional. can anybody tell me any good dvd product will teach me that. how did u guys learn to light like professional?? i want to educate myself...
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#2 Dror Dayan

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 08:09 AM

I suggest you start by working as an electrician, on student movies or low budgets which donĀ“t require much experience, and see how more experienced people are lighting.
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#3 Pete Wallington

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Posted 17 November 2011 - 11:55 AM

Absolutely, there's no better way of learning than from a more experienced DP on set.

Otherwise, subscribe to American Cinematographer magazine.
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#4 Bowie Rascal

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 03:52 AM

any other suggestion sir please, is there not even one dvd product or book can teach me some advance lighting??

Edited by Bowie Rascal, 18 November 2011 - 03:53 AM.

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#5 Bruce Southerland

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Posted 18 November 2011 - 06:25 PM

hello guys, i don't know how many of u can understand my frustration. i already learn basic of lighting, i really want to know advance lighting. i want to light scene's like professional. can anybody tell me any good dvd product will teach me that. how did u guys learn to light like professional?? i want to educate myself...

Kodak offers DVDs entitled Kodak Cinematography Master Class--with
some top cinematographers teaching their craft.
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#6 Gabriel de Bourg

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Posted 20 November 2011 - 09:35 AM

I'd recommend reading some of Art Adams articles:
http://provideocoali...ndex.php/aadams

Especially this one:
http://provideocoali...og_of_lighting/

It talks about fill light and I can tell you that it had a HUGE impact on my way of thinking. After reading this I found out the best place to place my fill lights... Underneath!

This is also a nice breakdown of a few shots by Janusz Kaminski, very nicely done.
http://thetwopointeight.tumblr.com/

But lastly, something that really helps? A set dresser. The best lighting I've done is when I haven't just lit persons, but rooms. Then you focus on bringing out the room and letting the actors move in it. This means setup takes longer initially, but little to no time between shots (you sometimes just adjust some lights for close-ups, but other than that, that's it). But the problems is that most rooms you shoot are... Boring. Getting a set dresser in there, creating something means you suddenly have something to work with!
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#7 Bowie Rascal

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 03:14 AM

any more suggestion guys??? please keep this post active..
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#8 Cristian Carceller

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 03:37 AM

This is a good video i enjoyed watching starring Dean Semler on firelight

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#9 Tim O'Connor

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 12:46 PM

I'd recommend reading some of Art Adams articles:
http://provideocoali...ndex.php/aadams

Especially this one:
http://provideocoali...og_of_lighting/

It talks about fill light and I can tell you that it had a HUGE impact on my way of thinking. After reading this I found out the best place to place my fill lights... Underneath!

This is also a nice breakdown of a few shots by Janusz Kaminski, very nicely done.
http://thetwopointeight.tumblr.com/

But lastly, something that really helps? A set dresser. The best lighting I've done is when I haven't just lit persons, but rooms. Then you focus on bringing out the room and letting the actors move in it. This means setup takes longer initially, but little to no time between shots (you sometimes just adjust some lights for close-ups, but other than that, that's it). But the problems is that most rooms you shoot are... Boring. Getting a set dresser in there, creating something means you suddenly have something to work with!


I went to the links above because you emphasized the impact of his articles on your approach. Thanks for posting such a great resource. I had to tear myself away for now because I have stuff to do but I enjoyed reading his articles so much that I was glad to see that there are many more of them on that site. They're well worth reading for people who have been doing this for a while as well as for beginners.
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FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Rig Wheels Passport

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

CineLab

Opal

Wooden Camera

The Slider

Aerial Filmworks

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Tai Audio

rebotnix Technologies

Glidecam

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Visual Products

Abel Cine

Technodolly