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Daylight or tungsten when shooting in a room with windows


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#1 Matt Stevens

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Posted 21 November 2011 - 09:44 PM

I'm just an amateur, so forgive my ignorance. There are two scenarios I need to talk about here in regards to choosing daylight vs tungsten stock for a Super8 project.

1. Shooting an actor in an apartment with large windows. Daylight will be the primary lighting source, but we will have some interior lighting in the mix. If I can get away with only using a bounce board, I will. But it's doubtful. So likely mixed lighting sources here.

2. Driving in a lovely BMW, shooting the actor in the rear seat and while we are shooting, the car will enter the Holland tunnel, so bye bye daylight, hello tungsten.

The likely camera used is a Canon 1014 XL-S.

So 250D or 200t?

And stock depending, where should I have the filter switch on the 1014 for those two scenarios?

Thanks, gang. B)
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#2 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 09:26 AM

Hey Matt;
I would go with Daylight stock on both of those.
For the car, when it drives into the tunnel, it'll be ok if it goes orange (though I doubt the tunnel is T lit. Chances are it's Sodium or Mercury Vapor lighting, in which case no film will resolve the color "right.") and we expect the color shift.

For the big windows, Again, daylight is your primary lighting; and unless you want to gel all your windows, you might as well shoot daylight. For the small lamps inside, the practicals, you can get photoflood bubs for pretty cheap and re-bulb them. They're 4800K if memory serves, so they still stay a bit warmer than the daylight coming in and look really quite pleasing. They don't burn for too long, though, so turn them off when not in use. Any other augmented lighting you have can either be daylight from the get go, or you can throw 1/2 CTB on them (full eats up too much light) and let them stay a bit warm.

That's just me, of course.
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#3 John Holland

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 12:53 PM

Its not just you Adrian ! Spot on i would do the same .
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#4 Matt Stevens

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 05:41 PM

Comments very much appreciated. Thank you. Sounds like a good plan.
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#5 Chris Burke

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 06:53 PM

I am assuming your shooting with Pro8mm if you are going to use super 8 250D. I have used the Fuji stock in super 8 and it was lovely, never used the Kodak 07 though. Please let us know if you do go that route. I have shot with the Kodak 7213 and have to say that it is kick ass. It has lots of color latitude as well as dynamic range in exposure. An easy option would be to shoot with the 7213, no filter at all and use daylight fluoros for your practicals and gel any lights you might use to match the window light. You can color time everything the way you like later on. This stock is extremely forgiving and very sharp. I highly recommend it. I mistakenly loaded a mag with 7213 when we intended to use 7219 for a night exterior. The 7213 held up extremely well, I couldn't tell the difference, except the 13 was very fine grained.
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#6 Matt Stevens

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Posted 22 November 2011 - 08:52 PM

Yes, sir. pro8 had a special and I snagged six rolls at a bargain price with no clue what I was going to do with them. Then I wrote a story that would allow me various interior and exterior locations so that I could use the variety of stocks I chose.

I had a meeting with a DP this afternoon and we discussed the situation at length.

This is going to be fun. I cannot wait to shoot it. B)
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