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just got a super 8mm cam, now what?


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#1 Keith Huntington

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Posted 26 November 2011 - 09:27 PM

so my inlaws were cleaning out their storage unit and found this in a camera bag with all the accessories. it has a cartridge of film still in it, kodak Ektachrome E160 Sound. have no idea if it is used or not. so my quetsion is, i have no projector so i can't even test anything.... but can i removed the cartridge? will it get exposed? further more, what type of film can i get if i did decide to do anything work anything? obviously i want film that records audio as well.... but all the film i keep seeing at B&H is silent and such.... and none of that even matched the 160. i have no idea where to go so i guess any assitance would be great. (i mainly work in DV, digital, and tape.... film is osmething i have never worked with.... or never thought it would work with.)
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#2 Matt Stevens

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 12:15 AM

The cartridge has likely been in here for two decades. Check the battery compartment for corrosion. Install fresh batteries and pull the trigger. See what happens.

That type of film is unless now, unless you want to pay a large fee to have it specially processed. But that camera is perfectly capable of shooting modern stocks such as tri-X reversal and Ektachrome 100D.
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#3 Keith Huntington

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 12:22 AM

the battery compartment was empty, and its very clean inside.... lens needs a good scrubbing it has dirt, mud, and such on it.... but everything else looks fairly clean....

the only thing i'm wondering... i found this over at kodak, but it doesnt say anything about audio.... is the strictly video recording, and would need an external source for audio recording (digital recorder, computer, tape deck, etc)? IS there any film still being made for 8mm in the 15-20 range that records audio?

(ps, i'm in america)
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#4 Matt Stevens

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 01:45 AM

No more sound on super8. Not for a loooong time.

Super8 film rolls are about two and a half minutes for 24 frame per second and a bit over 3 for 18 fps.

If the lens is as you describe, best to just junk it.
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#5 Keith Huntington

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 08:01 PM

No more sound on super8. Not for a loooong time.


so just out of curiosity.... do *most* people who shoot super 8 now-a-days use external audio recording solutions, or just do silent films now? like an amateur enthusiast. what is the general use for super 8 now, for amateur enthusiast if there is no audio film? just asking, i can easily record audio externally.... but i was just wondering...
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#6 Chris Burke

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 08:45 PM

yes, anyone who is doing sync sound dialogue with super 8 is shooting it using a "double system". Audio recorded to an external recorder. this is very easy with the advent of affordable compact flash recorders. if the lens is severely scratched, you do realize what you'll get? A severely scratched picture. You may want that and the effect may be useful for experimentation and the like. But don't give up. Post an ECU of the lens, showing any imperfections. Have you already cleaned it? I hope you were kidding when you said you'd give it a good scrubbing. You probably best buying another camera, which I highly recommend. It is a nice change of pace when shooting one format for a while. super 8 has a look like no other, have fun with it. check out these cameras and these
basically look for any "xl" camera, they are cheap. Buy a couple. Beaulieu 4008 on up are pretty much the best, because they have interchangeable lenses and a very sharp shutter. This produces the sharpest image you'll get with super 8. Great thing is, it is very easy to use, if you want a more pro look, go for a pro camera. If you want a home movie look, go for a consumer camera. Minolta, Bauer all have great cameras too. Loads out there that still work fine and are dirt cheap.
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#7 Matt Stevens

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Posted 27 November 2011 - 10:02 PM

Keith, I have a lot of super 8 stuff here...



A cool film shot on super8...


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Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Aerial Filmworks

rebotnix Technologies