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Nizo 481 a good choice?


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#1 Ben Saunders

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 01:34 PM

I'm looking for some first camera advice. Super 8 is new to me, though I have professional production experience (digital), so I'm not a complete newbie. Here's what I'm looking for: I'm trying to keep my camera budget around $150-$200. Rather than mess around with ebay I'd prefer to buy something that has been tested and has a warranty. So far that has lead me to consider the Nizo 481 macro from super8arena.

-Anyone had positive/negative experiences with them?

-I saw somewhere that the Nizos are belt-driven, which can stretch over time. Is this the case, and is it a reason to look at a different camera manufacturer?

-Compared to other camera options in that price range, is the nizo a good choice when it comes to optical quality? I'd like my images to be as sharp as possible. The macro and slo-mo features in this model are also appealing to me.

Any suggestions or advice are greatly appreciated, thanks for your time.
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#2 Alessandro Machi

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 04:46 PM

Spectra Film and Video sometimes has super cameras for sale. I think they actually test them to make sure they work. Probably a little more expensive than ebay, however on ebay I have found that people think because they don't know about super-8 cameras that it is ok to sell a problematical camera "as is".

www.spectrafilmandvideo.com
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#3 Matt Stevens

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 06:22 PM

I'm looking for: I'm trying to keep my camera budget around $150-$200.


Ben, The Nizo's glass is ok. But it's pretty much a camera you can shoot reversal stock on and that is it, unless you notch hack. Someone correct me if I'm wrong. B)

I would push you towards a simple Canon 514XL that can read negative stocks properly (gives them a light 'push' which is fine for negative). Super8arena has one for $91 plus shipping. That is a fine camera to learn on and can deliver the goods.

Only problem is that no 24fps or slow motion.

The Canon 514XL you can stick a 200t cartridge in and just shoot.

Same with the Canon 814 Auto Zoom Electronic. Now that is a camera. Will do everything you could possibly want.

eBay is hit or miss, but you can get some fine cameras in tip top shape there for less than at super8area if you buy smartly.

Super8arena's rep seems to be tip top.

Even better... Talk to Tom at Filmmaker8.com. He has numerous cameras for sale and will do you right.
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#4 Vincent Sweeney

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Posted 28 November 2011 - 09:55 PM

I've used a Nizo for paid work, more than a few times, and never had an issue. I own two and the S560 is very much a workhorse and simple, while providing 54fps, which is a big deal to me and something Canon doesn't offer, though I do like the Canons. The "Nizo Professional" is probably the nicest S8 camera overall with one of the best lenses ever, but its out of that budget. Only the big Nizos, like the 6080, are belt driven and as a result, are the quietest cameras made but it can be an issue when replacement is needed.

Negative film also works just fine in the Nizos.
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#5 Ben Saunders

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 03:04 AM

Thanks for the replies. Its encouraging to know this forum is so active given that I'm sure I'll have more questions once I get shooting. The more I think about it the more important the different frame rate options seem. I know that my budget restraints are going to prevent me from getting everything that I want, but I would hate to back myself into a corner by being limited to 18fps. My only real concern at this point is that I'm going to enjoy this format so much that I won't be satisfied with my entry-level camera a year from now. But i suppose that's a good problem to have.

It looks like at this point I am considering the 481, the 481 macro, and the S 56 as a slightly more affordable option, so any other input/advice about those models is welcome and appreciated.

Thanks!
Ben
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#6 Matt Stevens

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Posted 29 November 2011 - 09:47 AM

Negative film also works just fine in the Nizos.

You can shoot negative stock in any camera, but what will those Nizo's expose them at? They don't read above 160, so will they be exposed as 100 or 160? That's the question.
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#7 Ben Saunders

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Posted 30 November 2011 - 02:48 PM

If using 500T stock I'm assuming that using automatic exposure based on the internal meter would overexpose by 1.5 stops. Anyone know if that's right?
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#8 Chris Burke

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 09:23 AM

If using 500T stock I'm assuming that using automatic exposure based on the internal meter would overexpose by 1.5 stops. Anyone know if that's right?


I don't know if that is correct, but it probably is. The thing is, it isn't a big deal at all. I have shot plenty of negative stock on super 8 from 7274 on up. They have such exposure latitude, that being 2 stops over isn't a big deal. I often shoot "full auto" except for focus with no filter or anything else and the results are perfect. Most older, simpler cameras will expose the 7219 at about 160 asa. With an 85 filter in front of the lens, this is exactly where you want to be outdoors. Indoors, learn what the shutter angle is and use an external meter. With either 7213 or 7219, your going to get a very usable image in pretty much any camera, whether or not you cut out the notch or not. Color and exposure latitude are too broad to be "f*cked" up so much that you can't use it. If your said camera doesn't cut it, buy another that does, they are very cheap.

ben, pm me as I have several Nizos in great condition for sale.
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#9 Justin Lovell

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Posted 16 December 2011 - 01:03 AM

If using 500T stock I'm assuming that using automatic exposure based on the internal meter would overexpose by 1.5 stops. Anyone know if that's right?


This is correct, the nizo 481 meters in 40/160. 500t Will be quite over exposed. That said, it is still usable.
Top sample is some 500T I shot in Iceland.
Bottom Sample is 100D Cross-Processed at Niagara Custom Lab
Film scanned in 2k Raw at our studio - www.framediscreet.com

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