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nikon super 8x zoom and filter key


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#1 Fransiscus magastowo

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 12:08 AM

hi guys,

I apologized if there is another thread similar with this one.

I have a nikon super 8x zoom with a missing filter key. So far I shot one roll of reversal b&W film. I want to shoot with color using the 7285 EKTACHROME 100d Color Reversal Film. I understand that the 85A filter is on when the you remove the key.

If I were to shoot outdoor, should I leave the filter on (the filter key removed) or should I have the filter off? or it doesn't really matter.


last question,

Can I use 16mm projector to project super8 film?

thanks a lot.
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#2 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 10:02 AM

100D cartidges will tell the Nikon what to do. Just insert and shoot. Don't worry about the filter key on daylight film in daylight.
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#3 Joel Pierre

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 01:41 PM

Can I use 16 mm projector to project Super 8 film ?

No :

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#4 Fransiscus magastowo

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 02:21 PM

100D cartidges will tell the Nikon what to do. Just insert and shoot. Don't worry about the filter key on daylight film in daylight.


what about shooting indoor where it's luminated with tungsten?
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#5 Matt Stevens

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 04:10 PM

100D indoors isn't practical.

Should you go for it anyway, shoot a chart for your first shot. Correct the color to this chart on the computer and use those color settings on the rest of the footage. If you have a scan that is scene to scene color corrected, they will be able to handle this for you.

There are daylight balanced lights out there.

Advice: Shooting indoors you really need to use 200t or 500t for super8. This is from personal experience.
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#6 Geoff Howell

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 04:54 PM

what about shooting indoor where it's luminated with tungsten?


You'll need an 80A filter. Also, you can notch hack the cartage to expose for 250asa and have the lab push 1 and 1/3rd stops when processing.
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#7 Fransiscus magastowo

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 08:14 PM

thanks a lot everyone. that's what I figure you need a faster film for indoor, but i'm just going to do it anyway and color correct it if I need to. :)
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#8 John Woods

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 12:54 AM

thanks a lot everyone. that's what I figure you need a faster film for indoor, but i'm just going to do it anyway and color correct it if I need to. :)


The built in 85 filter will absorb light so you will lose speed and get a very orange cast to the film. Take an old credit card or other piece of plastic and cut your own filter key. If you are transfering to video then shooting daylight film under tungsten is practical. Just shoot a colour chart or just a sheet of white paper as the first thing you shoot so you can take the guess work out of adjusting your colour settings in your editor. Same advice goes for shooting Vision 200T under daylight conditions with no 85 filter.

When shooting B&W the 85 filter will act like an orange filter which can often be a good thing.
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#9 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:15 PM

I have a nikon super 8x zoom with a missing filter key. So far I shot one roll of reversal b&W film. I want to shoot with color using the 7285 EKTACHROME 100d Color Reversal Film. I understand that the 85A filter is on when the you remove the key.

If I were to shoot outdoor, should I leave the filter on (the filter key removed) or should I have the filter off? or it doesn't really matter.


Hi Fransiscus,

Have you tried shooting the Ektachrome 100D with the nikon super zoom yet? I came here to ask the same question, as I also have this camera with a missing filter key. Just wondering how it turned out for you?
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#10 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:18 PM

100D cartidges will tell the Nikon what to do. Just insert and shoot. Don't worry about the filter key on daylight film in daylight.


Are you sure about this, Matt?

I shot a trial cartridge of 100D in full daylight without the filter key and it seemed underexposed, though I only got about a quarter of the reel off before the camera chewed it up, so it wasn't possible to make a full assessment under a variety of lighting conditions.
I just don't want to waste any more film if I can help it.
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#11 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:23 PM

The built in 85 filter will absorb light so you will lose speed and get a very orange cast to the film. Take an old credit card or other piece of plastic and cut your own filter key.


For shooting outdoors in daylight, could you hack the notches to push the film speed? I like the idea of cutting my own filter key. Have you seen a picture of the filter key anywhere?

Thanks for the useful advice.
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#12 Matt Stevens

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 11:18 AM

Are you sure about this, Matt?

I shot a trial cartridge of 100D in full daylight without the filter key and it seemed underexposed, though I only got about a quarter of the reel off before the camera chewed it up, so it wasn't possible to make a full assessment under a variety of lighting conditions.
I just don't want to waste any more film if I can help it.

It sounds like it was exposed at 64 instead of 100, which a lot of super8's do with the 100D, unfortunately.
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#13 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 11:39 AM

It sounds like it was exposed at 64 instead of 100, which a lot of super8's do with the 100D, unfortunately.


You could be right. What can I do about this? Any suggestions?
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#14 John Woods

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Posted 11 January 2012 - 05:13 PM

If you shot 100D without a filter key installed then you will not get a properly exposed image in these early Nikon cameras.

I used to own the Nikon Super Zoom 8 which was the predecessor to the 8X. That camera was very similar to the 8X so my advice is based on that camera. These Nikons are amongst the earliest Super 8 cameras so they work a little differently that a typical 1970s super 8 camera.

The manual for Super Zoom stated you had to insert the filter key to have the internal 85 removed. At the time it was assumed a typical 1960s shooter was using tungsten film (that was all that was available) and it was assumed most Super 8 shooting was in a daylight situation so be default the 85 filter was in place. Therefore to use 100D with this camera you have to shoot with the filter key in otherwise you will have an 85 filter in front of it which will ruin your film. The 85 will absorb light which will cause underexposure & orange cast.

Do you have fresh batteries for the light meter? That could also cause exposure problems. The Super Zoom 8 required separate batteries for the light meter which I think the 8X also needs. These batteries are no longer made but you can use Wein Cell PX625 replacement batteries. Buy a bunch and don't store the camera with these batteries installed as it was my experience the batteries were exhausted fairly quickly.
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#15 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 02:55 AM

If you shot 100D without a filter key installed then you will not get a properly exposed image in these early Nikon cameras.

I used to own the Nikon Super Zoom 8 which was the predecessor to the 8X. That camera was very similar to the 8X so my advice is based on that camera. These Nikons are amongst the earliest Super 8 cameras so they work a little differently that a typical 1970s super 8 camera.

The manual for Super Zoom stated you had to insert the filter key to have the internal 85 removed. At the time it was assumed a typical 1960s shooter was using tungsten film (that was all that was available) and it was assumed most Super 8 shooting was in a daylight situation so be default the 85 filter was in place. Therefore to use 100D with this camera you have to shoot with the filter key in otherwise you will have an 85 filter in front of it which will ruin your film. The 85 will absorb light which will cause underexposure & orange cast.

Do you have fresh batteries for the light meter? That could also cause exposure problems. The Super Zoom 8 required separate batteries for the light meter which I think the 8X also needs. These batteries are no longer made but you can use Wein Cell PX625 replacement batteries. Buy a bunch and don't store the camera with these batteries installed as it was my experience the batteries were exhausted fairly quickly.


Thanks, John. That's the problem as I understand it. It's not so much an explanation that I need as ideas for how to overcome the issue of the missing filter key. You'd earlier suggested cutting a filter key from plastic, and I thought I might give that a go, but I've been looking for an image of the key to see what shape I need to cut. Probably should just try trial and error next.

I put new batteries in for the light meter. I haven't used the camera much at all, so I'm hoping they're still good.

I really love the weight and feel of this camera in the hand and had hoped to get it into usable order, rather than buying a more recent Super 8 off the Bay of E.
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#16 John Woods

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Posted 12 January 2012 - 05:44 PM

There is no special shape for the filter key just cut a rectangle that will slide into the slot.
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#17 Juha Vauhkonen

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 01:34 PM

Hello.

This is my first time posting on Cinematography.com, so here goes...

I bought the Nikon 8x Super Zoom and just picked up the camera.
I have a question about the viewfinder: Obviously there's the exposure meter visible up there, but my camera has also a red-orange "square" in the down-left corner, visible in the viewfinder. Is this OK?

At first I though it might be the daylight filter stuck halfway, but I checked the filter key slot, and it seems the filter doesn't even move that much when the key is pressed down. It doesn't have any effect on the visible square on my camera's viewfinder either.
I tried to search for the manual of the camera, but found only the Mondophoto basics.

I haven't got the Wein Cell batteries yet to check that the camera meter is fully functional, so I'm not sure about the "square" at the down left corner, and this might be really silly question:)

Any help would be appreciated.


Thanks,

Juha
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#18 Sam Brightwell

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Posted 28 February 2012 - 03:12 PM

Hi Juha

The red warning light appears in the viewfinder to tell you you're at the end of the film cartridge. Your footage counter should confirm this.
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#19 Juha Vauhkonen

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Posted 29 February 2012 - 01:08 AM

OK, Thanks Sam! Yes, I have no full cartridge to test the camera yet, and the counter is in zero. Will test ASAP.
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