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Kodak 5219 with elevated blue levels - shootable?


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#1 Mike Tounian

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 01:50 AM

Hi Folks,

I received four 1.000' cans of 5219, donated to my SC thesis film from a DP cleaning out his fridge, and after a snip test at Deluxe all four had elevated blue layer levels. Three of the cans were reading at 1.11, and one can was reading at 1.17.

I know that the Kodak optimal level is .85, and Deluxe recommended not using anything above 1.00, but I was wondering if someone here had any recommendations on a way to rate/process this particular stock that would still allow us to mix it with the new cans of 19 we'll have to buy from Kodak. We'd love to save this film and find a way to make it usable because it could save us a lot of money, but we also don't want to risk shooting a timebomb if it isn't salvageable.

I would greatly appreciate anyone's advice on the matter. Thank you!


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#2 Will Montgomery

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 10:17 AM

Are you transferring and finishing digitally or photochemically?

A decent colorist shouldn't have a problem with the elevated blue, but you can certainly shoot a test of 100' or so just to see if it will work for your process. Most lab folks will tell you to stay away from anything less than perfect, most colorists I've worked with tell me to use practically anything and they can usually make it look good (other than fogged or course).
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#3 Mike Tounian

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 12:32 PM

Hi Will,

Thanks for your reply. We are planning on finishing digitally, hopefully with a 2K DI.

I'm going to call Kodak and see if I can dig someone up who'd be able to tell me exactly what we're looking at. My hope is that we could use these cans on certain shorter scenes and keep them from being mixed with the meat of the film, and get away with it.
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#4 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 07 December 2011 - 12:47 PM

You should be alright. It's showing an elevated blue level fogging on the film; I would just rate it 1 stop slower, and shoot it but NOT mix it with new stock.
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#5 Marc Roessler

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Posted 08 December 2011 - 12:17 PM

Assuming he'd want to cut above the fog level by overexposure, he would need to overexpose by about 2 stops - is this correct? (This would be according to the 5129 sensiometric curve.. my reasoning is to make those parts usually exposed in the knee slide to densities > 1.17... right? Of course you'd be loosing two stops of highlight handling at the shoulder...)

Edited by Marc Roessler, 08 December 2011 - 12:18 PM.

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