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A few questions on ADR


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#1 Daniel Smith

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 07:59 PM

Hi,

I had a few quick questions about ADR if anyone has the time to help answer them.

I've never done ADR myself, but I find the concept interesting. I saw a clip on YouTube somewhere the actor is fed the original recorded sound, but with a series of metronome clicks before their next line to serve as their cue. Is this true throughout most ADR?

In terms of lining the audio up, do major film productions use automatic software for lineup or are they manually adjusted? I've been looking at 'Vocalign', a plugin for most major DAW's, it seems to do a pretty amazing job from the examples I've seen. Does the operator not listen to the original sound whilst recording, but just the live sound being recorded sound along with the video to see if they match roughly? Or do they listen to both the original and live sound being recorded to try and ascertain how much difference there is between them?

Also, how long is it expected for ADR to take? For instance, a minute long sequence full of dialogue, is it a lengthy process? I don't necessarily mean with all the post effects, I mean just a clean vocal record, aligned to match the original sound.

My last question is really the percentage of audio being replaced. Whilst I understand that either most or all the audio is replaced in post, is this really the case, even for extreme vocal work? By extreme vocal work I mean, an actors voice and tone slightly distorting due to emotion, either through extreme anger or upset. The reason I ask is that I've been paying a bit more attention to the ADR work in recent films, and I find it incredible the actors/actresses are able to reproduce that kind of emotion in their voice, in a sound booth or recording studio. But maybe I'm just underestimating their talent..

Any information is appreciated.

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 19 December 2011 - 08:03 PM.

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#2 Daniel Smith

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Posted 19 December 2011 - 08:05 PM

Does the operator not listen to the original sound whilst recording, but just the live sound being recorded sound along with the video to see if they match roughly? Or do they listen to both the original and live sound being recorded to try and ascertain how much difference there is between them?

I'm just trying to work out how the sound operator is able to judge if the new vocals have been recorded with enough accuracy, before any post-alignment.

Edited by Daniel Ashley-Smith, 19 December 2011 - 08:09 PM.

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#3 Matthew Freed

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Posted 11 August 2012 - 12:09 AM

I know this is an old post but I have to put a response.

First, the misconception that most or all audio is replaced in post is just downright stupid. Real productions hire experienced and skilled sound teams who mix and record the sound properly so it does not need to be replaced in post.

Very, very few actors are food enough to truly recreate the emotions. Sometimes ADR is needed and it is a necessary evil but it is by no means a large percentage of a professional movie.

As for how long does an ADR session take? It depends on how good your actor is at nailing their emotions and lines. And how good your audio editor is at piecing it together.

You know the best way to do ADR? Don't have to do it. Hire a good, professional sound mixer who knows what he or she is doing...budget properly for it and listen to them on set when they tell you it can't be fixed in post.
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