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how to save batterirs


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#1 Baburam

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 04:10 AM

Dear friends,
I have chance to go for a documentry shoot on mountain regions(but it is not sure yet). There is no electricity.How can I manage my batteries? Is there any alternative ways to charge the batteries and to give them large lives? Please help me.
Baburam Nepali
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#2 Chris Millar

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 04:59 AM

How long are you away from power? What kind of battery/camera? What voltage? How much shooting will you be doing? Will the camera need to be on all the time? (standby vs. running) etc...

The more info you give us the more helpful the replies will be Posted Image
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#3 Daniel Smith

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 04:17 PM

I remember once shooting a student documentary in Chislehurst Caves, and where it was cold I've never seen the batteries drain so quick. This only a suggestion but maybe it's worth keeping the spare batteries in Thermos bags?
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#4 Jonathan Bowerbank

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Posted 22 December 2011 - 09:11 PM

Can prod. get a small generator, and gas on a daily basis to you?

Will you have vehicles and plenty of gas? You could use a car power inverter to keep them charging.
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#5 Baburam

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 10:29 AM

Can prod. get a small generator, and gas on a daily basis to you?

Will you have vehicles and plenty of gas? You could use a car power inverter to keep them charging.

Thanks Jonathan
But it is in mountains, We can't get cars ,we need to trek for more than a week. I think I need a very light portable charger but there is no electricity.
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#6 Adrian Sierkowski

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 10:34 AM

When it's cold I often but some hot hands hand warmers and tape them to a battery and keep them in a cooler; with a small hole drilled in it to run the wires in/out (i'm talking block batteries here) and I fill the hole back in with cotton balls to keep 'em toasty.
If you're talking smaller batteries, they have solar chargers these days; often made as a back-pack, but you may want to look into a few photo-voltaic solutions-- though they charge slowly so you'll need a good deal of batteries.
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#7 Baburam

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 10:37 AM

How long are you away from power? What kind of battery/camera? What voltage? How much shooting will you be doing? Will the camera need to be on all the time? (standby vs. running) etc...

The more info you give us the more helpful the replies will be Posted Image

Thanks Chris,
I think it is one 3 to 7 days fr from power,The camera will be Sony Pd177. I think you know about the battery, For travel documentary I think I have to be standby as much as possible. I think you know the situation.
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#8 Baburam

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 10:41 AM

When it's cold I often but some hot hands hand warmers and tape them to a battery and keep them in a cooler; with a small hole drilled in it to run the wires in/out (i'm talking block batteries here) and I fill the hole back in with cotton balls to keep 'em toasty.
If you're talking smaller batteries, they have solar chargers these days; often made as a back-pack, but you may want to look into a few photo-voltaic solutions-- though they charge slowly so you'll need a good deal of batteries.


Thank you Adrian , Thank you very much.
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#9 Baburam

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Posted 26 December 2011 - 10:43 AM

I remember once shooting a student documentary in Chislehurst Caves, and where it was cold I've never seen the batteries drain so quick. This only a suggestion but maybe it's worth keeping the spare batteries in Thermos bags?

Thank you Daniel
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#10 viking jonsson

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Posted 20 March 2012 - 04:52 AM

Hello,
How did it go?
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#11 Baburam

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Posted 21 March 2012 - 10:23 PM

Hello,
How did it go?


I am so sorry that my trip cancelled(I don't know the reason). Thank you all friends for your help.
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#12 Victor Lazaro

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Posted 23 June 2012 - 07:40 PM

I'm intrigued about the solar solution mentioned above. Can anyone develop on this? Thanks.
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