Jump to content


Photo

Airstar Balloon Light


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 Martin Hong

Martin Hong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 January 2012 - 01:24 PM

Recently i just found out about this cool lighting gear by Airstar.. they have balloon, fly mattress light that are amazing to be in the place where no other light can be..

Posted Image

But a question came to my mind.. how'd they fit the light in a flying balloon? Can't find tech spec on their website: http://www.airstar-l...cinema-tv-photo

So i presume that the balloons are using helium, but how'd they manage to fit the light inside that's powerful enough.. with the heat problem? Helium is stable with heat going around?

Just curious about how they work... anybody care to explain? thanks!

Edited by Martin Hong, 09 January 2012 - 01:25 PM.

  • 0

#2 Martin Hong

Martin Hong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 January 2012 - 01:27 PM

Flying mattress in action...

Does a very great job and eliminating the rigging problem.. Although not windy day friendly

Posted Image
  • 0

#3 Stuart Brereton

Stuart Brereton
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 3059 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • Los Angeles

Posted 09 January 2012 - 02:05 PM

They don't put an actual lamp inside the balloon, just the globe, and whatever fitting it requires. They are often fitted with a mix of tungsten and HMI globes. Helium is an inert gas, so no problems with the heat. Obviously you don't switch the globes on until the balloon is inflated or you'd burn the fabric.
  • 0

#4 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 January 2012 - 02:39 PM

Does a very great job and eliminating the rigging problem..


Hmmmm, you're just rigging in reverse

I suppose its nice in that you can 'counterweight' the lamps weight and have a near neutral object - but you still have to lock it off in three dimensions which might involve some rigging fun
  • 0

#5 Martin Hong

Martin Hong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Student

Posted 09 January 2012 - 07:25 PM

They don't put an actual lamp inside the balloon, just the globe, and whatever fitting it requires. They are often fitted with a mix of tungsten and HMI globes. Helium is an inert gas, so no problems with the heat. Obviously you don't switch the globes on until the balloon is inflated or you'd burn the fabric.


I knew that they don't put the entire lamp inside.. but curious how its wired and mounted inside.. We are talking about HMI and tungsten, those are tricky to handle, just as you said, i presume that the fabric isn't that heat resistant.


Hmmmm, you're just rigging in reverse

I suppose its nice in that you can 'counterweight' the lamps weight and have a near neutral object - but you still have to lock it off in three dimensions which might involve some rigging fun


Chris, what i meant was something like this

Posted Image

For a overhead light it becomes easier since you dont need heavy duty rigs or cranes..
  • 0

#6 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 09 January 2012 - 09:04 PM

Sure, but imagine those in the wind though...
  • 0

#7 Martin Hong

Martin Hong
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 137 posts
  • Student

Posted 10 January 2012 - 02:18 AM

Sure, but imagine those in the wind though...


lol yeah, that's why i said its not wind friendly



I still can't find any details from the inside construction.. Since i would like to experiment with something
  • 0

#8 Nathan Porter

Nathan Porter
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Electrician
  • Wiltshire / London, UK

Posted 11 January 2012 - 05:47 PM

I've just been around these on a shoot, and from what I can gather with a few chats with the balloon op, inside the balloon is just a bubble in a holder with a (very sensitive) safety circuit which senses the inflation of the balloon. If it's under inflated, the thing won't turn on, or it'll cut out if there is a leak. We used the tungsten versions, which had external boxes housing switches and fuses. They would've been great if it wasn't for the wind.
  • 0

#9 Nathan Porter

Nathan Porter
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 16 posts
  • Electrician
  • Wiltshire / London, UK

Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:02 PM

Sure, but imagine those in the wind though...


If they really had to be used in windy situations, I've heard about them being inflated in scaffold cages and sent up on a cherry picker.
  • 0

#10 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 11 January 2012 - 06:10 PM

If they really had to be used in windy situations, I've heard about them being inflated in scaffold cages and sent up on a cherry picker.


Sounds like the perfect solution.
  • 0


CineLab

CineTape

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

The Slider

Abel Cine

Technodolly

Paralinx LLC

Rig Wheels Passport

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Willys Widgets

Glidecam

Aerial Filmworks

Wooden Camera

Opal

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Metropolis Post

Tai Audio

Ritter Battery

CineLab

Aerial Filmworks

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Technodolly

Ritter Battery

Abel Cine

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

rebotnix Technologies

CineTape

Opal

Wooden Camera

Glidecam

Tai Audio

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

The Slider

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Rig Wheels Passport

Paralinx LLC