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Film stock used in The Royal Tenenbaums


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#1 Niamh Mac

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 12:43 PM

Hi
does anybody know what film stock was used in The Royal Tenenbaums or what would produce a similar look?
I am a newbie and would really appreciate the help!
Many Thanks!
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#2 Francesco Bonomo

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 02:05 PM

Hi
does anybody know what film stock was used in The Royal Tenenbaums or what would produce a similar look?
I am a newbie and would really appreciate the help!
Many Thanks!


according to IMDB it was shot on Kodak Vision 250D 5246 and Vision 500T 5279 (I don't have the American Cinematographer issue about it, so I cannot double-check). However, shooting on the same film (not available anymore, btw), wouldn't give you the same look. The "look" depends on many things, and film stock is only one part of a much larger equation.
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#3 David Mullen ASC

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Posted 15 January 2012 - 03:12 PM

Hi
does anybody know what film stock was used in The Royal Tenenbaums or what would produce a similar look?
I am a newbie and would really appreciate the help!
Many Thanks!


It was shot in 35mm anamorphic Panavision using common Kodak color negative stocks of the time, 250D and 500T. Trouble is when students ask questions like "what stock was used to create this look?" they think they can get the same look shooting in 16mm, for example, when the original film was shot in 35mm, particularly anamorphic 35mm. If it was the sharpness or grain structure that stood out for you, then the size of the negative would be a contributing factor. If it were the optical distortions of anamorphic lenses, particularly the barrel distortion of the 40mm anamorphic lens used in that movie, then shooting in spherical lenses would give you a different look. And of course there are the compositions, the lighting, the production design, etc. that factor into the look.

There were no particular film stock, filters, or lab or digital processing "tricks" used on "Royal Tenenbaums" to create that look; it's just a well-exposed negative, using the larger anamorphic 35mm format as well, to create the look plus all the arts of cinematography and production design.
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#4 Niamh Mac

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 11:24 AM

Many Thanks fellas! I realise its not all down to the stock but I am covering all bases and trying to get as much information into my head as possible! Thanks for the replies!
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