Jump to content


Photo

How long can a 16mm Loaded on camera be used for?


  • Please log in to reply
13 replies to this topic

#1 flavio filho

flavio filho
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 247 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 16 January 2012 - 09:34 AM

I've loaded a 100ft spool of a Kodak B/W 100iso on my Bolex Rex 5
I used part of film for a shooting this weekend. But I still have around 50ft to use in about 2 weeks.

My question is... HOW LONG can a 100ft spool stay inside a camera body and still be used without loosing its full capabilities?

Thanks,
Flavio
  • 0

#2 Jerry Murrel

Jerry Murrel
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 82 posts
  • Little Rock, AR

Posted 16 January 2012 - 11:05 AM

I've loaded a 100ft spool of a Kodak B/W 100iso on my Bolex Rex 5
I used part of film for a shooting this weekend. But I still have around 50ft to use in about 2 weeks.

My question is... HOW LONG can a 100ft spool stay inside a camera body and still be used without loosing its full capabilities?

Thanks,
Flavio


You shouldn't have any issues with the schedule you discussed.

According to Panavision, you should be fine as long as you get the processed film into the lab
within a month or so of purchasing the film. Apparently, the chemistry of motion picture film is less stable
than still photographic film. Usually at the end of a picture, left over film is sold for short-ends rather than
kept for long periods of time.


-Jerry Murrel
CineVision AR
Little Rock

Edited by Jerry Murrel, 16 January 2012 - 11:06 AM.

  • 0

#3 flavio filho

flavio filho
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 247 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 16 January 2012 - 12:23 PM

You shouldn't have any issues with the schedule you discussed.

According to Panavision, you should be fine as long as you get the processed film into the lab
within a month or so of purchasing the film. Apparently, the chemistry of motion picture film is less stable
than still photographic film. Usually at the end of a picture, left over film is sold for short-ends rather than
kept for long periods of time.


-Jerry Murrel
CineVision AR
Little Rock



Hi Jerry

Thanks a lot.

So, you mean by "purchasing the film" actually "open and loading into camera"?
I'd have no more than a month to end shooting? Then I have to send it to be processed...

Just to be sure I got it right.

;)
F

Edited by flavio filho, 16 January 2012 - 12:24 PM.

  • 0

#4 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1582 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 16 January 2012 - 04:27 PM

You could potentially leave that roll of B&W in the Bolex for years and then shoot the last 50ft. and it would be just fine.

-Rob-
  • 0

#5 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 16 January 2012 - 08:42 PM

You could potentially leave that roll of B&W in the Bolex for years and then shoot the last 50ft. and it would be just fine.



As long as you don't forget it is there and open the camera!

Time to keep film is a bit different depending on what sort of Movie making you are doing. If you are using a Panavison unit, you are probably doing a "full blown" feture type production where you might have to intercut shots made at the start and end of the shoot a couple of months apart. Fred is talking to Joan in a shot done on the back lot, but Joan replies in a shot taken in front of Toronto City hall standing in for some other building taken in a two week location trip. (Toronto always stands in for some other location)

There you really have to be fussy about keeping things stable.

Now you have a roll of B&W in a Bolex, you will shoot the rest of it probably in different light anyway. The very least the action is not be inter-cut with your first 50 feet. That takes a lot of pressure off. Kodak says that they plan on Movie film being used in 6 Months from the time they ship it, but there still films which use the same technology have a 2 to 3 year best before date. So yes, Use it within the year, even if only to get your camera back.

I actually was doing a small test recently where I took a roll of 7222 out of my Fridge and shot a few feet in an Very old 16mm Auricon camera just to see if the Camera worked. I shot and processed the test in October but according to the date code (KA) the film was made in 2004. see http://flic.kr/p/be65Pz

Edited by Charles MacDonald, 16 January 2012 - 08:55 PM.

  • 0

#6 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1582 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 16 January 2012 - 11:10 PM

We ran a few rolls of Plus-X from the early 1970's last year that someone sent into the lab.... Was it grainy? Yep... Were there half way decent pictures on it? Yep....

-Rob-
  • 0

#7 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:35 AM

We ran a few rolls of Plus-X from the early 1970's last year that someone sent into the lab.... Was it grainy? Yep... Were there half way decent pictures on it? Yep....

-Rob-


reversal plus-X as neg or as reversal ?
  • 0

#8 John Woods

John Woods
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 48 posts
  • Electrician

Posted 17 January 2012 - 12:48 AM

I actually was doing a small test recently where I took a roll of 7222 out of my Fridge and shot a few feet in an Very old 16mm Auricon camera just to see if the Camera worked. I shot and processed the test in October but according to the date code (KA) the film was made in 2004. see http://flic.kr/p/be65Pz


Interesting. Just how do you read the date code?
  • 0

#9 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1582 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 11:43 AM

reversal plus-X as neg or as reversal ?



I think it was negative but I will have to see if Bill in the B&W department remembers what it was.

-Rob-
  • 0

#10 Chris Millar

Chris Millar
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 1642 posts
  • Other

Posted 17 January 2012 - 02:37 PM

I think it was negative but I will have to see if Bill in the B&W department remembers what it was.

-Rob-


Processing reversal b&w as neg will be grainy - you're keeping the exposed silver that was meant to be washed away and for whatever reason it is grainier (better sensitivity??)

I have a features worth (with borderline ok shooting ratio) of 25 year old plus-x here - processes quite well in reversal, neg is grainy
  • 0

#11 Robert Houllahan

Robert Houllahan
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1582 posts
  • Industry Rep
  • Providence R.I.

Posted 17 January 2012 - 03:09 PM

It was 7231 B&W Neg according to Bill.....

-Rob-
  • 0

#12 Charles MacDonald

Charles MacDonald
  • Sustaining Members
  • 1157 posts
  • Other
  • Stittsville Ontario Canada

Posted 17 January 2012 - 04:56 PM

Interesting. Just how do you read the date code?


It is part of the edge print.

On the current Keycode coded films it is a part of the emulsion code. on print and some reversal films it is actually shown as a year. On Pre-key-code stock they used a series of Symbols which repeated over a 20 year cycle with a few Expections.

http://motion.kodak..../Keykode/id.htm has the table of years for "Modern" film near the bottom of the page.
  • 0

#13 flavio filho

flavio filho
  • Basic Members
  • PipPipPip
  • 247 posts
  • Cinematographer
  • London

Posted 18 January 2012 - 04:09 AM

Great stuff! Thanks everybody!
  • 0

#14 Jock Blakley

Jock Blakley
  • Basic Members
  • PipPip
  • 73 posts
  • Other
  • Melbourne, VIC

Posted 07 February 2012 - 08:33 AM

It is part of the edge print.

On the current Keycode coded films it is a part of the emulsion code. on print and some reversal films it is actually shown as a year. On Pre-key-code stock they used a series of Symbols which repeated over a 20 year cycle with a few Expections.

http://motion.kodak..../Keykode/id.htm has the table of years for "Modern" film near the bottom of the page.

Though it must be noted that some of the Year Codes are the same as some of the Stock ID Codes - so in this case, "KA" following the emulsion numbers at the end of the human-readable section between the Keykode barcodes indicates manufacture in 2004. If the "KA" was at the start of the large-text section immediately before a barcode, it would indicate that the stock in question was Eastman Colour Intermediate Film 5/7243.

It makes sense in time :P
  • 0


CineTape

Ritter Battery

Visual Products

FJS International, LLC

Opal

CineLab

The Slider

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Technodolly

Glidecam

rebotnix Technologies

Tai Audio

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Willys Widgets

Metropolis Post

Paralinx LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Glidecam

Opal

Visual Products

rebotnix Technologies

Broadcast Solutions Inc

CineLab

Technodolly

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

Paralinx LLC

Tai Audio

Willys Widgets

Ritter Battery

The Slider

Abel Cine

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

CineTape

FJS International, LLC

Aerial Filmworks

Metropolis Post

Wooden Camera

Rig Wheels Passport