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Which shot works better?


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#1 Lee Tamer

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 02:59 PM

Sorry if this is in the wrong forum I wasn't sure where it would fit.

What's bugging me is the light on the left of the frame in the first image. Which of these shots works better? Is the light a big problem? I'm wondering if it would be too much of a distraction. Does it bother anyone?

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#2 Seba Vuye

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 03:10 PM

For me it depends what he is actually saying, if it's something emotional or he is whispering i would go with the first one despite the light (didn't actually see it at first because I instantly focused on the actor), and personally I like the first shot better.

The second one has to much unneeded background information on the actor's left for me but the light issue is gone off course.
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#3 Stuart Brereton

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 05:24 PM

The composition in the first frame is much better. The lamp on the wall could have been dealt with by moving the actor's marks slightly, although it doesn't bother me particularly.
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#4 Lee Tamer

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Posted 19 January 2012 - 05:52 PM

I should mention this was shot on a DSLR using only the lighting in the building, which i had no control over.
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#5 Matthew Parnell

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 08:14 AM

I like the one with the light. Perhaps if had you knocked back the lamp with some nd or a smaller globe so it wasnt such a blown out highlight it would have been better, but I dont know the context of the story, so the other might work better in that respect, telling a story is more than just pretty pictures.
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#6 Seba Vuye

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 08:19 AM

I like the one with the light. Perhaps if had you knocked back the lamp with some nd or a smaller globe so it wasnt such a blown out highlight it would have been better, but I dont know the context of the story, so the other might work better in that respect, telling a story is more than just pretty pictures.


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#7 Kevith Mitchell

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 01:41 PM

I like the second one.

It shows the space where this scene takes place and makes you look briefly down the hallway for a second.

As for the light, I see it as forced separation between the two actors, when you have subtly created the separation by the use of color in the second shot (black shirt/white wall/black suit)nice contrast. The light in the first just makes a "hot spot" on a white wall drawing unneeded attention : )
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#8 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 02:48 PM

The first shot is far better, composition-wise. Yes...I figured this was digital simply from the harshness of the way the light is burning into the wall. Yep, some ND gel probably would have helped. But since you can't go back and re-shoot, I'd stay with the first shot. Much more interesting. As the previous poster stated, the light creates a divide between the two actors and a bit of depth since the light is softly focused (as opposed to the second shot with flat walls.)
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#9 Tom Jensen

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:16 PM

Both suck. just kidding. I like both. The first for the reason already mentioned that it adds separation between the characters and the second for the depth that it adds. Seriously, go with performance of the actor.

Edited by Tom Jensen, 20 January 2012 - 05:17 PM.

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#10 Lee Tamer

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 05:43 PM

Here is the reverse shot, just for comparison.

One with the light
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One without
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And the color isn't exact, white balance was tricky
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#11 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 08:58 PM

Yeah, it's pretty much exactly what Matt said. What if the hallway and the exit sign carry great significance to your overall story? We can't exactly tell, but it's one of the reasons why composition is so dependent on story and mood, and not just on creating a nice singular frame.

Also for the next time, just knock back the light with some ND or black masking tape, but even the blown out light, that can be to an artistic effect. Also lighting to around the bulb's exposure will help reduce it.
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#12 Lee Tamer

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:47 AM

Thanks for the comments everyone. I guess i'm just being too nit picky about the scene. This is for my senior thesis film so i'm being a bit of a perfectionist about it
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#13 Bill DiPietra

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 10:56 AM

Thanks for the comments everyone. I guess i'm just being too nit picky about the scene. This is for my senior thesis film so i'm being a bit of a perfectionist about it


That's the way to be for every project.
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#14 Lee Tamer

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 09:02 PM

Also does the shadow on the woman's neck bother anyone?
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#15 Marcus Joseph

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Posted 21 January 2012 - 09:24 PM

Also does the shadow on the woman's neck bother anyone?

Yeah that bothers me, and those eye shadows too.

Edited by Marcus Joseph, 21 January 2012 - 09:25 PM.

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#16 Lee Tamer

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 10:26 AM

The setting is supposed to be at night. I know the main reason for the shadows is the position of the actors but I'm fine with it.
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#17 Brian Drysdale

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 10:36 AM

In the second set the light does become distracting because it appears to be growing out of the woman's head.

I'm not sure why you're getting the white balance variations, because once you've set it in the camera for a scene it usually stays the same, unless there's been a change in the lighting colour temperature.
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#18 Lee Tamer

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Posted 22 January 2012 - 11:46 AM

I think what happened is for the first shot is it was set for tungsten when there were flourescent fixtures in the background. The shot originally had a green tint to it thats why I'm thinking it was that.
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