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1000ft cut down technique


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#1 Paul Bartok

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 08:55 PM

Hi guys Ive recently purchased some film for really cheap and one of the short ends is a 1000ft (long end) I don't think we will be able to get a 1000ft mag to resolve this issue, how do you cut down or split 1000ft into 2 x 400ft etc. is there equipment/technique that you can do your self or does it need to be done by a lab? if this has already been discussed please link I couldn't find anything
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#2 K Borowski

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Posted 20 January 2012 - 09:14 PM

Do you have a re-wind bench to use? You'll need to do two winds on it if you are using Keykode, as it won't work if it is oriented backwards when run through the camera.

Also, you realize you won't be able to get a third 400-foot out of 1000 feet, unless you curve the fabric of space time and utilize the fifth dimension ;-)
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#3 Kevith Mitchell

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 12:07 PM

A bench, rewinds, and a dark room. Go to ebay and get some rewinds for $5.00 : )
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#4 Charlie Peich

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 01:26 PM

A bench, rewinds, and a dark room. Go to ebay and get some rewinds for $5.00 : )


Better get a couple of 1000 ft or 1200ft (safer size to handle the 1000' roll) 35mm split reels. One of your rewinds should have a "tight wind" attachment on it and they should have drag adjustments. Winding the film too lose could cause "cinch marks" on the film before you expose it. Also, you don't want to put a loosely wound 400 ft roll in the camera, as it feeds out it could cause cinch marks when the film is pulled and tightens on the core, or torn sprockets when the lose, freely feeding film suddenly hits the proper tension applied by the feed spindle's clutch, especially if you're shooting high frame rates.

Make sure to remove all the dust in the room you're doing this in. Posted Image

Charlie
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#5 Paul Bartok

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Posted 23 January 2012 - 04:59 PM

Thanks Charlie very insightful :)
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#6 Will Montgomery

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Posted 25 January 2012 - 12:46 PM

Easiest way is to go to your lab and have them spool it down onto (2) 400 ft and (1) 200 ft reel for you.

If you use them for processing they usually don't have an issue doing that for you. My lab spools down large rolls onto Eyemo reels all the time for free with the understanding that I will process with them.
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