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Video Clips of Mitchell Cameras


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#1 Peter Char

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Posted 27 January 2012 - 07:15 PM

Now we all love these cameras, the problem I find sometimes is finding test footage of these gems.

example. Right now I'm looking to see what the fries mitchell 35R3 looks like in motion.

I'm sure there are plenty of films out there shot on the formats but it'd be great to make a database of examples, listing films shot with such camera_ such lenses_ and maybe even include clips.


but in any case, anyone have any Fries Mitchell 35r3 footage that they've shot or have seen online anywhere? I'm trying to get an idea of how well the camera runs before I start walking in the domain of considering the purchase of one.

Thanks!
Peter

Edited by Peter Charuza, 27 January 2012 - 07:16 PM.

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#2 Stephen Williams

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 03:15 AM

Most VFX & motion control work shot on films over the past 30 years has been done with Fries Mitchells, some R35's others 35R3's. I bought one from Digital Domain that was used on Titanic & Dante's Peek. It images looks just like any other 35mm film camera.


Now we all love these cameras, the problem I find sometimes is finding test footage of these gems.

example. Right now I'm looking to see what the fries mitchell 35R3 looks like in motion.

I'm sure there are plenty of films out there shot on the formats but it'd be great to make a database of examples, listing films shot with such camera_ such lenses_ and maybe even include clips.


but in any case, anyone have any Fries Mitchell 35r3 footage that they've shot or have seen online anywhere? I'm trying to get an idea of how well the camera runs before I start walking in the domain of considering the purchase of one.

Thanks!
Peter


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#3 Peter Char

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Posted 25 February 2012 - 11:54 PM

Thanks for the info. I was worried that these may not run as smooth or create some sort of aberrations in the image. But aside from a few factors like its cumbersome size and such it seems like a worthwhile camera. For $5,000 its really a sweet deal for an indie film maker. That is depending on the camera noise. :D

Thanks!

Edited by Peter Charuza, 25 February 2012 - 11:54 PM.

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#4 Chris Millar

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 01:10 AM

They are sought after for the work they do because they are smooth - (registration = smoothness).

What sort of aberrations do you refer to ?
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#5 Stephen Williams

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Posted 26 February 2012 - 03:52 AM

Mitchell was the gold standard, Panavision use pretty much the same movement, you can't improve on enigneering design from 90 years ago!
I still earn a large proportion of my income from using a Mitchell, which some will find odd as I own an Epic!
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New Pro Video - New and Used Equipment

Media Blackout - Custom Cables and AKS

FJS International, LLC

Willys Widgets

Broadcast Solutions Inc

Gamma Ray Digital Inc

Aerial Filmworks

Technodolly

Visual Products

Metropolis Post

CineLab

Rig Wheels Passport

Tai Audio

Paralinx LLC

Wooden Camera

Abel Cine

CineTape

rebotnix Technologies

The Slider

Glidecam

Ritter Battery