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removing a lens flare in post


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#1 Lee Tamer

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Posted 28 January 2012 - 11:44 AM

Simple question, is there any way to do this? I'm using Adobe Premiere CS 5
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#2 Dima

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Posted 08 March 2012 - 12:07 PM

No, there is no way to do this. What you filmed is what you get -- you can't magically make something disappear. Unless you try rotoscoping it and placing a background plate behind the flare area. But that would just look terrible.
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#3 Eugene Lehnert

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Posted 02 May 2012 - 01:06 PM

You would need to do some extensive compositing work. You would need to find someone skilled with Flame or Nuke or Shake or After Effects.
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#4 Oliver Hadlow Martin

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 02:25 PM

It's possible, but more likely significantly easier to re-shoot it probably.
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#5 Chris Millar

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Posted 12 May 2012 - 09:01 PM

I've seen someone painstakingly do this on a flame - takes a loooong time. You use previous and /or future frames to cover up the flare. Issue is that you can make each frame look nice in isolation but once you watch it in 24fps sequence you have a little wiggly splatch sprabloinking around your frame which is even worse. At the time that necessitated the real time/hardware accelerated approach to be able to view results, without that it'd be a poop of a job.

Solution = time or $$$
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#6 Chris Millar

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Posted 13 May 2012 - 01:14 AM

The more I think on it the more I remember - the hardest issue to deal with was that it was a handheld shot so both the flare moved in reference to the frame, the subjects moved with reference to the flare and on occasion occluded the light forming it in the first place. It also popped into and out of an actors hair to make things interesting. I'm saying all this as if the situation was dire but the movement actually allowed the comping of 2D tracked elements from past and future frames whereas if the shot was locked off the flare would sit in the same spot all the time and you'd have to clone similar areas instead of actual areas - so much is dependent on the particular shot its hard to say what will be involved in your case.

Edited by Chris Millar, 13 May 2012 - 01:17 AM.

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