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Tips how to avoid unwanted lensflare?


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#1 Seba Vuye

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:24 AM

Can I do something in my shooting process to avoid this type of a problem, or is it only fixable in the post?

Any tips?

Ow yeah, i do not shoot with a professional camera but with a 600D.

Thanks.

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#2 Mark Dunn

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 07:27 AM

Nothing you can do will prevent a reflection like this when you're looking straight into a light. A prime with fewer elements, or a more expensive zoom, might reduce it or give it a better shape but there will always be something there.
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#3 Seba Vuye

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Posted 30 January 2012 - 10:24 AM

Nothing you can do will prevent a reflection like this when you're looking straight into a light. A prime with fewer elements, or a more expensive zoom, might reduce it or give it a better shape but there will always be something there.


ok thanks markPosted Image
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#4 Evan Kimball

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 11:56 PM

I'm not assuming anything, but a lot of people using DSLR's and coming from photography and using that equipment will keep there uv or skylight filters on and this causes awful flares. If you, or anyone reading this, have uv filters on, take em off for the shoot. I support the use of protective filters because over time cleaning dust of your lens can leave cleaning marks, so a filter that is on when the lens is stored really helps keep cleaning to a minimum. Just never film with it on.
And if you didn't do it, no, nothing you can do. Most of the time you can try to line the flare up with the light source so it can't be seen.
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#5 Tom Jensen

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 01:31 AM

In general, shooting with primes is usually desired because there is less glass in a prime lens than a zoom. Use filtration in combination like an 85nd3 for example instead of an 85 and an ND3. Always use lens shade or a matte box in conjunction with hard mattes. Neither of which would have helped in this instance. You can also use French flags and grip flags. If filters are the cause try sandwiching them together or tilting them forward. In a panavision matte box you can used three filters with two opposing trays. Just be sure not to drop the loose filter when you pull it from the matte box. Just keep in mind that a flare is light bouncing off a piece of glass onto another.
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