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Lubrication and maintenance of a Filmo DA


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#1 Robert Broughton

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 05:09 PM

Hi all,

I have recently aquired a Filmo DA that, by all acounts, hasn't been run since the early 1940's. The winding is very stiff and the movement sluggish, so I expect it needs a good stripping, degreasing and light oiling. Does anyone have any hints and tips or thoughts on where to start?

Many thanks,

Rob
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#2 Robert Houllahan

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Posted 01 February 2012 - 05:58 PM

Before you disassemble you might want to try to oil it through the marked oil holes in the film compartment and then wind and run the camera a few times.

The front of the camera with the gate and shutter is easily removed, there is a central nut on the front of the turret and if you remove that (Do it in a bag as there are three spring loaded cams for the detents on the turret which will fly across the room!!) you can get to the two screws that hold the mechanism to the body. I think there is also a larger locating screw on the back side too. Once the front is removed you can fairly easily get to the guts to lubricate the mechanism. I would suggest winding the spring and letting it out several times to free it up, don't try to remove it without making a jig for it to slide into, it is under allot of pressure and if it suddenly unwound it could injure you.

Check You-Tube to see if someone has posted a dissasembly video....

-Rob-
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#3 Robert Broughton

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 10:54 AM

Having just picked the camera up, I find that the key "slips" about the shaft without actually winding. Is there some sort of clutch or ratchet mechanism inside?

Once I've cleared a few projects off the table I'll make a start on it. Its good to be able to leave it out and come back later.

Rob
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#4 Charles MacDonald

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 12:11 PM

Having just picked the camera up, I find that the key "slips" about the shaft without actually winding. Is there some sort of clutch or ratchet mechanism inside?


The winding key on a filmo disengages when it is folded flat as the shaft turns as the camera runs. when the flap is upright it should engage the shaft. You can pull the key out to examine it.
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#5 David Leugers

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Posted 15 March 2012 - 10:39 PM

The spring that drives the camera is very, very dangerous even if you have a jig and are familiar with handling it. A fully wound spring, such as in a situation where the camera was wound up but will not run, is a bomb looking to go off. A bomb made out of a long flexible Ginsu knife. I once had the misfortune of having a fully wound spring jump the containment ring tool and it was incredibly violent just like an explosion. It blew apart the camera jig snapping steel shafts and gears and anything else in the way. Fortunately I had a fraction of a second to jump back pulling my hands away to protect my face when I saw the spring start to move on its own. I was lucky and only received bad bruises and minor cuts to both hands. I will not mess with them. You may and you might never have an issue. With all the Filmos out there with good spring motors, why take the risk? Besides, you can use an electric motor with many of them. If a Filmo is gummed up from lack of lube and use, some good penetrating light weight oil at first to break the mechanism free, then apply good camera oil very often does the trick. Good luck!
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Visual Products

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