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Want to buy a Cam


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#1 Miguel Zamora Jr

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Posted 02 February 2012 - 08:50 PM

I am looking into buying a digital camera to practice my film making skills, and also gain work out in the field. I am a current film student, and have been mainly using 16mm film cameras (Bolex and Arri).

I have been thinking of getting a 7D Canon. Does anyone have any tips or maybe point me to an informative site that will help me purchase the correct camera for my stage of film making.
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#2 Evan Kimball

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Posted 03 February 2012 - 01:03 AM

Don't spend a lot on a camera frankly. No one wants to hear that, camera's are fun and owning your own is great. But everyone and their dog seems to have a 7D or t2i and you can borrow one if you really like the way they look. The are expensive and kit lenses are not very cinema friendly with the aperture change during zooms, slow speeds, distortion, and chromatic abberation. You then end up spending another grand on glass and never on what really matters: acting, lighting, props, and good food to pay the crew. You've already shot with cameras that make beautiful images so ask yourself what about those shoots did you enjoy most, was it really being a DP? You can get a Canon vixia for 400ish or even other cheap consumer stuff that takes good video and will teach you all that you need to know. I shot DV for years and with good lighting and flashy editing it made it onto television.
If you must buy a camera with a big sensor because everyone is a shallow depth of field nut, I suggest the GH2. If you buy into Canon you get stuck with their proprietary lenses and a mirror box that is un-needed. The GH2 can take a lot of old, legacy lenses that work great. You can get a whole set of vintage lenses and an adapter for cheap, and the plastic kit lens that comes with it auto focuses fast and has a continuous focus mode. You can also pick up jobs with a GH2 because record times reach into the hours and I have been able to record live events and documentaries (and my narratives) with one. It is half the price of a 7D and with the extra money get a mic. Good luck.

Edited by Evan Kimball, 03 February 2012 - 01:04 AM.

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#3 Miguel Zamora Jr

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Posted 04 February 2012 - 11:47 PM

Evan, thank you very much. That was better advice than any site I've visited. Cheers.
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#4 Michael Ward

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Posted 04 March 2012 - 10:52 PM

I have to say I agree with Evan. I went from a HV40 to the GH2 and I love it. I got a great special at B&H Video for $1100, this included the 14-140mm lens package.. Unlike the Canon models, the GH2 is geared towards video first and stills second. I picked up a used Juicedlink and used Rode NTG-3 and a few used prime lenses on Ebay..basically for under $2000 I have a complete run and gun filmmaking setup. You won't regret it.
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#5 Victor Nhat Nguyen

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Posted 26 March 2012 - 10:39 PM

Don't spend a lot on a camera frankly. No one wants to hear that, camera's are fun and owning your own is great. But everyone and their dog seems to have a 7D or t2i and you can borrow one if you really like the way they look. The are expensive and kit lenses are not very cinema friendly with the aperture change during zooms, slow speeds, distortion, and chromatic abberation. You then end up spending another grand on glass and never on what really matters: acting, lighting, props, and good food to pay the crew. You've already shot with cameras that make beautiful images so ask yourself what about those shoots did you enjoy most, was it really being a DP? You can get a Canon vixia for 400ish or even other cheap consumer stuff that takes good video and will teach you all that you need to know. I shot DV for years and with good lighting and flashy editing it made it onto television.
If you must buy a camera with a big sensor because everyone is a shallow depth of field nut, I suggest the GH2. If you buy into Canon you get stuck with their proprietary lenses and a mirror box that is un-needed. The GH2 can take a lot of old, legacy lenses that work great. You can get a whole set of vintage lenses and an adapter for cheap, and the plastic kit lens that comes with it auto focuses fast and has a continuous focus mode. You can also pick up jobs with a GH2 because record times reach into the hours and I have been able to record live events and documentaries (and my narratives) with one. It is half the price of a 7D and with the extra money get a mic. Good luck.

Wish some one told me that before I got the t2i. Frankly I think Canon is starting to slip a little bit.
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