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User manual for Sony DXC-950?


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#1 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 07 February 2012 - 10:56 PM

Ive been looking online for ages for the user manual of the Sony DXC-950 but have had no luck. Would anyone know whereabouts I could obtain this manual (apart from Sony who would charge a premium for it)?
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#2 Mark Stahlman

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 04:19 PM

Patrick: Go to user-manuals.com and the buy the DXC-950 Service Manual PDF for $7.99, which contains the user manual up front -- that way you'll also have what you need for alignment or other repairs and get your money worth. Best -- Mark
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#3 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 05:01 PM

Thankyou! Sounds like a bargain price too!
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#4 Mark Stahlman

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Posted 08 February 2012 - 06:16 PM

Patrick:

I've been collecting some Sony SD cameras over the past month -- since I'm a sucker for what was once $6000 (or $15,000) professional equipment that now sells for $100's on eBay. The shift to digital & HD has forced a lot of 10-year-old video gear to be sold at very attractive prices.

Yes, they often have problems (and many of the parts are no longer available) -- so just buy two of them and make a working unit (all you need is some basic board-swapping skills.)

In the "industrial" camera category, I've got a DXC-930, DXC-950 and DXC-970MD (same as 950) plus PSU, cables and remote controller.

User-manuals.com has service manuals for them all and, for some like the DXC-D30, these are also out-there on the Net.
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#5 Patrick Cooper

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Posted 09 February 2012 - 07:47 AM

In the "industrial" camera category, I've got a DXC-930, DXC-950 and DXC-970MD (same as 950) plus PSU, cables and remote controller.


Nice collection you have there. I just have the DXC-950 myself minus a lens. I don't have a power supply either. Ive heard that with the right specifications, you can give the info to an electronics company who can build you a power supply that you can plug into the mains?

Yes, they often have problems (and many of the parts are no longer available) -- so just buy two of them and make a working unit (all you need is some basic board-swapping skills.)


I wish I had board swapping skills. If only my dad was still around to teach me stuff like that. Speaking of potential camera problems, there's something that I'm a little paranoid about. Do the CCDs in such cameras have some sort of protective surface? I was talking while holding my DXC-950 and a tiny little bit of slyther happened to come out of my mouth and into the camera's open lens port and landed on the exposed surface inside. The slyther was wiped off - hopefully nothing to worry about? I don't believe I was so careless.
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#6 Mark Stahlman

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 11:59 AM

Patrick:

There is nothing too special about the power supply for these cameras. The CMA-D2 is rated at 13VDC 1.3A, which is similiar to the typical "12V" used throughout professional video.

Internally, the cameras have their own power supplies (called DC-DC convertors) which take the nominal (sometimes spec'ed as wide as 10-17V) power and generate all the internal voltages needed. Unfortunately, these tend to fail in older industrial cameras (particularly if they've been left on all the time) and can be impossible to replace (and hard to repair, partly because Sony doesn't publish schematics.)

In one of my recent eBay wins I got a "custom" cable that allows you to use a standard 4-pin XLR or even a "barrel" type supply. If you want to get someone to make a cable for you, the Hirose 12-pin connector should cost around $20.

The CCD's are buried behind a lot of "glass" in these cameras, so what you actually hit was likely the bluish-tinted "optical filter" that sits in front of all the rest. It can actually be unscrewed and cleaned if you need to. In some situations, these filters get the dreaded lens "fungus," so it's a good idea to keep it clean.

Mark
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