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Low budget 16mm kit


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#1 Antonio Castles

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Posted 10 February 2012 - 10:22 AM

Hello,

I'm new to this forum, and I guess this kind of question has been asked over and over, but I have to do it one more time taking into account my particular needs: I'm looking for a 16mm camera for an art project (I'm an art student) that will take place in a year. I have almost no experience with cinematography: I have filmed some rolls of super 8 with "manual" exposure, and I have developed them in a Lomo tank I own, and that is practically it. I know how to reversal-process a roll of black and white film, and I have also developed E-6 a couple of times. In this project I will be developing the film also: I need the film to be projected directly, so I think I will be shooting Ektachrome and Tri-x (any suggestions on this point?), and I will develop it personally in my darkroom. I do not need sound sync: since I don't have an exposure meter (any suggestions?) I was thinking that maybe a Krasnogorsk would be a good option for the price, and, with the rest of my money, I would buy the exposure meter, some film, some filters, and some books.

Does this seem to have any sense? I appreciate your help and your time.

Also: I need some projectors, but I need to make the same strip of film go through all of them at the same time (say, for example, three projectors)... any recommended model? and what about loop playback? what do I need to do that?

PS: I have a decent amount of 35mm canon lenses; can I use them in 16mm?

Edited by Antonio Castles, 10 February 2012 - 10:24 AM.

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#2 Freya Black

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 05:48 AM

Hello,

and I have developed them in a Lomo tank I own, and that is practically it. I know how to reversal-process a roll of black and white film, and I have also developed E-6 a couple of times. In this project I will be developing the film also: I need the film to be projected directly, so I think I will be shooting Ektachrome and Tri-x (any suggestions on this point?),


Yes unless you intend to try and make prints then you will only have the choice of Tri-X and Ecktachrome 100D these days.

Oh and the eastern european stocks like fomapan and maybe Orwo etc if you can track them down but fomapan needs special chemistry AFAIK.

any recommended model? and what about loop playback? what do I need to do that?


Well a looper might be good if you can rent or build one. Short loops can just be loops tho. Depends how long the film is...

PS: I have a decent amount of 35mm canon lenses; can I use them in 16mm?


In theory yes but you will find they will be a bit telephoto in 16mm. An 18mm lens wouldn't be all that wide in 16mm whereas it would in 35mm...other than that no problem as long as you are able to get an adaptor that will match your camera or your lenses.

love

Freya

Edited by Freya Black, 11 February 2012 - 05:49 AM.

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#3 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 11 February 2012 - 09:35 PM

Hey Antonio,
An old spring wound Bolex used to be my camera of choice for this kind of thing. Can do single frame for pixilation or animation, in camera effects. Stay standard 16mm and just use the old Bolex primes. They are normally quite sharp.

If you like tinkering with mechanical things it is possible to make a crude optical printer with an old projector head and a bolex. Worked for me years ago.

It is also possible to set up a crude B&W contact printer. I bipacked the film in the picture gate of a flatbed editor and exposed it with a thin slit of light from my magnalight torch. Some carboard construction with that for positioning and catching stray light. Cardboard cartons covered the spools. Results were not bad. Not as consistent or predictable as a lab.

Cheers,
Gregg.
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#4 Antonio Castles

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Posted 12 February 2012 - 09:21 PM

Thanks for your answers. I don't understand fully: what does "print" mean in cinematography? coming from a photographic background this is very confusing. Thank you again.
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#5 Gregg MacPherson

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Posted 13 February 2012 - 03:21 AM

Thanks for your answers. I don't understand fully: what does "print" mean in cinematography? coming from a photographic background this is very confusing. Thank you again.


I was a bit hurried and didn't explain much. Print commonly means a positive exposed from a negative. So if you shoot camera negative you can process that and then make a positive print for editing, projection. So all your processing was negative rather than reversal. You can use reversal camera stock and make a positive (reveresal) print from that also if you had some reason to.

Prints for projection or editing are normally made in a contact printer. The processed negative sits in contact with the print stock as they move continuously through the machine. If your art film can have some rough edges or inconsistencies than you can improvise something for crude contact printing.

An optical printer, in the siple case basically re-photographs the camera negative frame by frame. Again, if you can accept something less than the commercial lab with the results then you can improvise a DIY optical printer. It's quite a lot of work to set up for even a crude result, but if you enjoy that kind of thing it's super interesting.

Cheers,
Gregg.
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#6 Andrew Glenn Miller

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Posted 27 February 2012 - 10:52 PM

Personally, my vote is for the bolex.

Probably because it suits my needs the most!

It is the best in it's price range!

I love the look! The crank! The turret! The daylight spools! Perfect for landscape and experimental. Easy to learn and easy to modify.

It's all a man needs, it's a nice swiss watch, but at the same time its the one camera I would trust to get down and dirty with. It's pretty much awesome. This is a man's cameras.. B)
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